Archive for the ‘audio interfaces’ Category

h1

I•ONIX U42S Lexicon ® streamlines the desktop recording interface

April 23, 2009

7380247e3b79ce0f0c774b5d9b4a00c9

Brilliantly designed, The Lexicon I·ONIX U42S USB 2.0 Audio Interface Desktop of the I·ONIX Recording Series fits where it makes the most sense, between your keyboard and monitor. With all monitor and input level controls at your fingertips, you’ll wonder why no one ever thought of it before.

The Lexicon IONIX U42S USB 2.0 Audio Interface features the newly designed dbx microphone preamps on every channel, the I·ONIX series is more than equipped to provide professional recordings that keep your music sounding its best.

The Lexicon I·ONIX U42S records four analogue and two digital channels simultaneously.

The Lexicon I·ONIX U42S USB 2.0 Audio Interface main features include:

  • USB 2.0 connection to DAW – up to 480Mbps
  • 44.1 to 96kHz sample rates, 24-bit resolution
  • Analogue ¼” and XLR combi-jack inputs on the rear panel for mic/line inputs
  • Analogue ¼” TRS (Stereo Main) outputs
  • dbx® high-voltage, ultra-low noise mic preamp’s on all analogue mic/line inputs
  • Supports Windows® and Mac® platforms 48V phantom power for each input pair
  • Input signal metering via 8 LED’s per channel Signal mixing and stereo bus signal metering
  • ¼” high output headphone connection(s)
  • MIDI In/Out
  • Zero latency monitoring
  • Low latency ASIO drivers
  • Lexicon Pantheon II VST/AU reverb plug-in
  • Software suite includes Steinberg®’s Cubase® LE4, and Toontrack® EZdrummer® Lite

Specifications:

  • Combi-jack Analogue Inputs: 4
  • Simult. Recording Sources: 6
  • Microphone Preamps: 4
  • Hi-Z Instrument Inputs: 2
  • S/PDIF
  • MIDI
  • Headphone Connections: 2
  • ¼” TRS Analog Outputs: 2
ionixu42s_keyfeatures

Don’t sacrifice your desktop or your music.

You care intensely about your music. It’s more than a pastime – it’s a passion. Lexicon understands your passion and it inspires us to innovate. Brilliantly designed, the I·ONIX Desktop Recording Series fits where it makes the most sense, between your keyboard and monitor. With all the level meters and gain controls at your fingertips when using your DAW, you’ll wonder why no one ever thought of it before.

Featuring newly designed dbx® 60V high-voltage, ultra-low noise mic preamps on all 4 channels, the I•ONIX U42S is more than equipped to provide professional recordings that keep your music sounding its best. The preamps run on a high-voltage supply to guarantee stability and provide you with a superior recording across a wide dynamic range. Performance driven A/D – D/A converters ensure pristine 24-bit/96kHz audio to capture every subtle detail of your performance.

The I•ONIX U42S can record four tracks at once and includes 4 combi-jack mic/line inputs with +48V phantom power, 2 TRS balanced line outputs, 2 hi-Z instrument inputs, 2 high power 1/4″ headphone outputs, S/PDIF and MIDI I/O. Dedicated knobs and meters offer easy access to input and output levels and locking combi-jacks make sure that a connection is not lost in the middle of a performance.

Pantheon Hall

The Lexicon name is synonymous with “the world’s best reverb.” The Pantheon™ II VST/AU reverb plug-in features 6 reverb types with 16 adjustable parameters, and 35 factory presets that range from Vocal to Live Sound and Special Effects. It’s easy to complete your mix and make your music sound its best with the exquisitely rich, full reverbs that made Lexicon famous.

No compromise performance – ergonomic brilliance.
Pure genius.

ionixu42s_rear_lg

h1

How to Make Your Guitar Sound Like a Sax! The Sonuus G2M

April 22, 2009

g2m_usage_map


No modifications are required to your guitar; no special pickups to install; and nothing needs to be “stuck” onto your instrument. It works with all electric guitars.

The G2M™ is a simple-to-use, highly effective, guitar-to-MIDI converter. It is “Universal” because it doesn’t need a special pick-up mounted on your guitar, but instead simply connects to your guitar like any other effects pedal or tuner.

Designed to give accurate triggering, with low-latency, it is a true plug-and-play solution for monophonic MIDI guitar. It can be used to sequence bass lines and guitar solos add an edge to your live performances — it opens up many creative possibilities.

Features

  • Any electric guitar can be used as a solo MIDI guitar.
  • No guitar modifications or special pickups required.
  • Robust note detection — minimises wrong notes.
  • Accurate pitch-bend determination.
  • Low latency.
  • Built-in tuner for standard guitar tuning.
  • Battery-powered with long battery life.
  • Compact, lightweight and portable.

Universal Appeal

No modifications are required to your guitar; no special pickups to install; and nothing needs to be “stuck” onto your instrument. It works with all electric guitars.

The G2M™ universally appeals to all guitarists from novices to seasoned professionals. Keenly priced to fit any budget, with the robust reliable performance expected by the finest stagemen.

Incredibly simple to use:

  1. Plug your guitar into instrument in to power-up the G2M™
  2. Connect your MIDI device (or computer) to the MIDI out
  3. Play notes on your guitar and MIDI will be sent out!

Powered from a single PP3 battery, its long battery life combined with small size makes the G2M™ the ideal accessory to keep with your guitar. Not only does it provide fast and precise tuning, but it also gives you instant MIDI capability for any electric guitar!

Robust Performance

Research has shown us that the most important aspect for pitch-to-MIDI conversion is reliable and reproducible triggering of notes. While low-latency is important, robust triggering is the key to usability — you can easily adapt to some latency, but you cannot adapt to random, spurious notes.

By virtue of the unique, inherently robust technology used in the G2M™ you will be able to reliably generate accurate MIDI quickly and easily. Notes are generated exactly as played, and the nuances of your performance are captured with fast, accurate pitch-bend data.

Built-in Tuner

The built-in tuner uses our PULSAR™ tuning technology where the power LED doubles as a tuning indicator. This innovative tuner gives you a fast and accurate way to tune your guitar.

Instrument Thru

Featuring a high-impedance input circuit, the G2M™ won’t sap your tone when using it “in-line” before your amp, or other effects pedals. You can then easily combine MIDI sounds with your normal guitar sound for some exciting musical possibilities.

Improves Playing Technique

For optimal MIDI conversion, your guitar playing needs to be clean and accurate. Accidental notes, resonating open strings and other sounds can often be converted into undesired MIDI notes. Often you don’t hear these when playing guitar yourself, but can detect them easily when listening live to the generated MIDI.

Striving to improve MIDI note accuracy, encourages clean picking and accurate fingering, with good control over non-sounding strings by damping them.

Not only will your MIDI output be more accurate, your normal guitar playing will sound clearer and more professional. It’s like having a tutor sitting beside you giving you advice. It’s also great fun!

Most of all, it’s Fun!

When you try the G2M™ and generate some new sounds, the first thing that strikes you is how much fun it is. Unleash new creative inspiration and invigorate your soul.

Specification

  • Power supply 9V PP3 battery. Average current consumption < 10mA. (Typically more than 70 hours operating time.)
  • Tuner notes E2, A2, D3, G3, B3, E4 (Standard 6-string guitar tuning)
  • Tuner accuracy <1 cent when pulsing at <1Hz
  • Note detection range E2 to E6
  • MIDI latency 16ms to 30ms depending on note and characteristics of input signal
  • MIDI power 5V (via 200 ohm resistor as per the MIDI specification)
  • Size 83mm x 58mm x 34mm
  • Weight 80g (without battery)
  • Inputs 6.35mm mono jack (switches unit on when jack is inserted)
  • Outputs 6.35mm mono jack connected directly to input jack. Standard 5-pin MIDI socket.
  • Switches Boost switch to select between low- and high-output guitars
h1

Reminder: Tonight’s Cakewalk Event Postponed! Plus New V-Studio 100 Coming Soon

April 15, 2009

unhappy-lawyer

Postponed Till Further Notice!

Unfortunately the event has had to be postponed until further notice. Keep checking back with a new date for this event .

Whether you are interested in purchasing SONAR V-Studio 700, SONAR 8, or just want to see it the two products in action, Cakewalk Product Specialists will soon be at the Leaf Tea Shop & Bar to offer one-on-one training and clinics .

postcard_splash_cakewalk_v_studio_15_04_09

And news just in on a new addition to the V series …

It’s called the V-Studio 100 and, unlike the flagship 700 system, it can operate with or without a computer.

Difficult to classify, the new device is in fact a number of products bundled into a compact, sturdy-feeling box. It’s got an eight-input mixer, on-board effects- and dynamics-processing, a metronome, and a built-in flash-memory recorder and player, but it can also operate as a multi-channel USB 2.0 audio interface and a mini DAW controller for Mac and PC.

Its single fader is motorised and touch-sensitive; two of the audio inputs
vstudio100

feature phantom-powered mic preamps, and there’s transport control and assignable buttons for mouse-free computer control. What’s more, the V-Studio 100 comes with a collection of plug-ins and virtual instruments, the VS Production Suite, which work on Macs and PCs and provide tools for everything from instrument-processing to peak limiting; electric pianos to wavetable synthesis.

As you can imagine, there are dozens of potential applications for the new V-Studio. Cakewalk say that it’s perfect for small bands performing live, who could play backing tracks from the SD card, while using the mixer section to feed the PA. Also, for home studio users, who need a basic USB interface, a mixer for signal routing, a stereo master recorder, and DAW control for ease of use.

Source: SOS

h1

Noel Gallager and Focusrite combine for TCT live sessions

April 1, 2009

Oasis songwriter teams up with Focusrite and Gareth Johnson to record and mix live sound for Teenage Cancer Trust…

Noel Gallagher Teenage Cancer Trust gig

Noel Gallagher at his Teenage Cancer Trust gig

Gareth Johnson is no stranger to recording live music. For years now he’s been drafted in for live mixing duties for the likes of Kasabian, The Who, Kaiser Chiefs and Duffy. Now he’s adding Noel Gallagher to a CV that’s littered with A-listers from the cream of major record labels and a stack of independents too.

For the last four years Gareth has also been involved with the Teenage Cancer Trust (TCT) gigs, an annual outing for the charity that sees them pack the Royal Albert Hall (RAH) for a week of stellar performances from some of the biggest stars of the day.

As a part of raising awareness for the week-long festival, which kicked off  March 24th, Gareth has been drafted in to capture the sound of rock‘n’roll once again.

To coincide with this year’s concerts, Noel Gallagher released the recordings of his performance at TCT RAH in 2007. The Oasis singer and songwriter performed a selection of Oasis’ greatest songs, as well as some of his favourite tracks by other artists, including There Is A Light That Never Goes Out by The Smiths and Butterfly Collector with Paul Weller.

The new live disc, The Dreams We Have As Children, was released digitally and as an exclusive covermounted 11-track CD with The Sunday Times.

Over the years Gareth has become a tour-de-force on the live circuit, assembling a rig that he can rely on to get the best results – the artists he’s recording are global superstars, so there can be no compromise and no second takes.

Gareth and his Liquid Mix

Gareth and his Liquid Mix

“To capture the performance we use Focusrite Octopre preamps. I chose them because they’re reliable and neutral enough to leave scope for a wide range of mix options.”

“Then for mixdown, I need to be able to instantly recall settings on complex mixes with high track counts, which is where Focusrite’s Liquid Mix comes into its own. Working with racks of traditional outboard on projects like this would be a massive pain, but with Liquid Mix it’s just not an issue.”

“Basically Liquid Mix has revolutionised the mix process by enabling me to introduce some great tones and colour into my mixes. No patchbays, no dodgy cables – just a virtual rack stocked full of the finest outboard known to man!”

Using Liquid Mix also means I can keep costs to an absolute minimum, which is essential when working with the TCT. So the whole rig consists of Focusrite Octopres at the front end, then into the Macbook Pro (and Logic) before bringing in the Liquid Mix. Finally I run the audio through an external 16 channel summing box before taking a stereo mix back into the computer. Of course good monitoring is always important, and for this I use my trusted KRKs.

“The Liquid Mix is a real solution for a very real problem. Yes, of course I want bottomless pockets to buy loads of great outboard for my studio, but that’s just not going to happen. I can, however, afford the Liquid Mix, which is much more convenient and packs just as much of a punch. Ultimately, what we have here is a revolutionary product.”

“Dynamic convolution is a great asset in the studio. I own a few of the units that have been emulated on Liquid Mix, and while it’s nice to look at a rack full of expensive outboard gear, in the context of a large multi-track mix you would be hard pressed to tell the difference between the emulation and the real thing.”

“Liquid Mix is a great way to get character, colour and tone into your mix, and really useful for getting elements to jump out in the mix. I used API 550b emulations on the guitars, I love the 1176 on the vocal, while for the strings I opted for the Massive Passive emulation. Then I used the SSL G series comp to glue the mix together. And the results? Well, they’re just awesome.”

Links:

Liquid Mix at Dolphin

Teenage Cancer Trust website

Oasis Myspace page

The Complete Noel Gallagher Gear Guide

To view Oasis gear available at Dolphin Music, please visit the Oasis Artist Page

h1

Make Your Own Multitouch Screens: Max Multitouch Framework

March 24, 2009

The idea : control max user interface directly within a multitouch screen. This “framework” consists in a set of max abstractions. to “multitouchize” a patch, you just need to place an “mmf.interface” abstraction in your patch, and add to presentation mode and give a name to all the UI object you wish to control with your multitouch screen… and that’s all ! MMF will do the rest… to talk about MMF, repport bugs, request features, share patches.

Max Multitouch Framework by composer Mathieu Chamagne makes turning your Max patch into a multitouch interface a breeze. When I first reviewed the Lemur, I was frustrated by the hardware-style abstraction between your software and the interface. Why was I having to go through Max patches painstakingly assigning Lemur controls to Max controls – why not just make the Max controls appear on the multitouch screen? Well, that’s exactly what you get with MMF. Using a set of Max abstractions, all you have to do is build your Presentation Mode style UI and add in the MMF ingredients – it automagically becomes touchable on a variety of displays.

It’s not hard to imagine how great this could be for musicians, especially those who have already been building original sonic creations in Max/MSP. Best of all, you don’t need an expensive, non-portable table with a projector inside, either – commodity hardware works just fine right now.

h1

Livid’s Ohm64: Love Child of a Monome and a DJ-VJ Mixer Controller?

March 20, 2009

Look out, Akai APC40. There’s another contender in the emerging Controller With Lots of Buttons And Also Faders and Knobs and Crossfader product category. Livid’s Ohm64 combines the light-up button grid with faders, knobs, trigger buttons, and most importantly, unique customization options and a lovely wooden case. What’s unique about this one:

  • High-end materials: anodized aluminum faceplate, “immersion gold-platted circuit boards” (guess that’s circuit bling), an optional wooden body (aluminum is available, as well, but wood is more fun).
  • Not mass-market: hand-assembled, small-production Austin creation.
  • Fully class-compliant, no drivers (also true of the APC as far as I know, but nice – and ideal for Linux, too, in case you want to run this with a netbook or a Pd-running souped-up *nix laptop)
  • Open-source, customizable MIDI talkback: when you’re ready to customize just how those LEDs light up, there are included open source tools and fully programmable MIDI mapping

Bonus: it comes with a powerful, full-featured VJ app in the box, Cell DNA, though of course you can use it with anything you like.

The real story to me is the customization. Whereas the APC40 is entirely proprietary in design, has evidently limited MIDI mappings, and a mysterious mechanism for programming two-way communication, the Ohm64 is open, open source, and software-agnostic. If the open source thing catches on, that could mean a community of friendly folk thinking of smart ways to reprogram this thing for different apps. Ironically, that means that in the long run, the Ohm64 could wind up with better Ableton Live integration than the hardware Ableton chose to back – though all bets are off until we get these devices in our hands.

I would say the APC is probably more direct competition for the Ohm64 than the Monome, despite the 8×8 light-up buttons. The Monome is much lighter and slimmer, it takes a minimalist approach (no big knobs or faders), and uses OpenSoundControl in place of MIDI. The Ohm64 seems likely to appeal to those who weren’t Monome fans, and visa versa. And some lucky ducks are naturally going to own both.

But the important thing is that the Ohm64 joins the Monome in its crusade for open-source customization of a commercial product. Whatever the Ohm64 is when it ships, it’s that question of what people can do with it that may determine its real value. I have no doubt people will be reverse engineering the APC40, too — starting with figuring out how to fake the hardware “handshake” it uses so other devices can emulate it in Live. But it’ll be interesting to see how these different philosophies pan out, so to speak.

We’ll keep you posted….

Souce:  Create Digital Music


h1

AKAI release Vintage Beat Machines for MPC

March 17, 2009

vintagelogo_web

Fat kicks and raw snares.

Vintage Beat Machines is a a sample library for MPCs containing all kinds of classic drums and percussion sounds. You’ll find some of the most common sounds, and some sounds you’ve likely never heard before. These sounds are from drum machines, beat and rhythm generators, and other synthesizers dating from the 1980s all the way back into the 1960s!

These sounds have the less-refined, more raw sound qualities that many producers prefer for their drums. Until now, building a library of these classic sounds has meant locating expensive and rare equipment – a time-consuming and costly process. With the Vintage Beat Machines Sample Pack for MPC, you’ll have everything you need in a single, affordable download.

According to the manufacturer, this sample pack works with all MPC models and contains samples and analog synthesis-based sounds from nearly all well-known units dating back to the 1960s.

This sample pack works with all MPC models and contains samples and analog synthesis-based sounds from more than 55 different beat machines.

  • Sample library for all MPC models
  • Classic drum and percussion sounds from drum machines, beat and rhythm generators, and other synthesizers
  • Less-refined, more raw sound qualities
  • Samples and analog synthesis-based sounds
  • Sound from from more than 55 different beat machines
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 46 other followers