Posts Tagged ‘MIDI’

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How to Make Your Guitar Sound Like a Sax! The Sonuus G2M

April 22, 2009

g2m_usage_map


No modifications are required to your guitar; no special pickups to install; and nothing needs to be “stuck” onto your instrument. It works with all electric guitars.

The G2M™ is a simple-to-use, highly effective, guitar-to-MIDI converter. It is “Universal” because it doesn’t need a special pick-up mounted on your guitar, but instead simply connects to your guitar like any other effects pedal or tuner.

Designed to give accurate triggering, with low-latency, it is a true plug-and-play solution for monophonic MIDI guitar. It can be used to sequence bass lines and guitar solos add an edge to your live performances — it opens up many creative possibilities.

Features

  • Any electric guitar can be used as a solo MIDI guitar.
  • No guitar modifications or special pickups required.
  • Robust note detection — minimises wrong notes.
  • Accurate pitch-bend determination.
  • Low latency.
  • Built-in tuner for standard guitar tuning.
  • Battery-powered with long battery life.
  • Compact, lightweight and portable.

Universal Appeal

No modifications are required to your guitar; no special pickups to install; and nothing needs to be “stuck” onto your instrument. It works with all electric guitars.

The G2M™ universally appeals to all guitarists from novices to seasoned professionals. Keenly priced to fit any budget, with the robust reliable performance expected by the finest stagemen.

Incredibly simple to use:

  1. Plug your guitar into instrument in to power-up the G2M™
  2. Connect your MIDI device (or computer) to the MIDI out
  3. Play notes on your guitar and MIDI will be sent out!

Powered from a single PP3 battery, its long battery life combined with small size makes the G2M™ the ideal accessory to keep with your guitar. Not only does it provide fast and precise tuning, but it also gives you instant MIDI capability for any electric guitar!

Robust Performance

Research has shown us that the most important aspect for pitch-to-MIDI conversion is reliable and reproducible triggering of notes. While low-latency is important, robust triggering is the key to usability — you can easily adapt to some latency, but you cannot adapt to random, spurious notes.

By virtue of the unique, inherently robust technology used in the G2M™ you will be able to reliably generate accurate MIDI quickly and easily. Notes are generated exactly as played, and the nuances of your performance are captured with fast, accurate pitch-bend data.

Built-in Tuner

The built-in tuner uses our PULSAR™ tuning technology where the power LED doubles as a tuning indicator. This innovative tuner gives you a fast and accurate way to tune your guitar.

Instrument Thru

Featuring a high-impedance input circuit, the G2M™ won’t sap your tone when using it “in-line” before your amp, or other effects pedals. You can then easily combine MIDI sounds with your normal guitar sound for some exciting musical possibilities.

Improves Playing Technique

For optimal MIDI conversion, your guitar playing needs to be clean and accurate. Accidental notes, resonating open strings and other sounds can often be converted into undesired MIDI notes. Often you don’t hear these when playing guitar yourself, but can detect them easily when listening live to the generated MIDI.

Striving to improve MIDI note accuracy, encourages clean picking and accurate fingering, with good control over non-sounding strings by damping them.

Not only will your MIDI output be more accurate, your normal guitar playing will sound clearer and more professional. It’s like having a tutor sitting beside you giving you advice. It’s also great fun!

Most of all, it’s Fun!

When you try the G2M™ and generate some new sounds, the first thing that strikes you is how much fun it is. Unleash new creative inspiration and invigorate your soul.

Specification

  • Power supply 9V PP3 battery. Average current consumption < 10mA. (Typically more than 70 hours operating time.)
  • Tuner notes E2, A2, D3, G3, B3, E4 (Standard 6-string guitar tuning)
  • Tuner accuracy <1 cent when pulsing at <1Hz
  • Note detection range E2 to E6
  • MIDI latency 16ms to 30ms depending on note and characteristics of input signal
  • MIDI power 5V (via 200 ohm resistor as per the MIDI specification)
  • Size 83mm x 58mm x 34mm
  • Weight 80g (without battery)
  • Inputs 6.35mm mono jack (switches unit on when jack is inserted)
  • Outputs 6.35mm mono jack connected directly to input jack. Standard 5-pin MIDI socket.
  • Switches Boost switch to select between low- and high-output guitars
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SENOR COCONUT’S CUT-AND-PASTE, LATIN-DANCE EXCURSION

April 21, 2009

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Like an inspired tape splice between ’50s Latin bandleader Perez Prado and some overachieving club DJ, Señor Coconut matches cha-cha, merengue, and mambo rhythms with precision techno style. Layering vintage samples, programmed rhythms, vocals, and live instrumentation in Digidesign Pro Tools (LE 6.4 on an Apple Mac G4 PowerBook), he created exhilarating Latin-dance tracks for his sixth album, Around the World (Nacional Records, 2008).

“I have cut and moved and touched manually every single sound you hear,” says the German-born Señor Coconut (whose real name is Uwe Schmidt, but who also uses the alias Atom), referring to his new CD. Replicating the percussion mayhem and full brass shouts of a Latin big band, Schmidt painstakingly organizes his basic ingredients into complex Latin arrangements.

“I work in layers within Pro Tools,” he says. “First I arrange the rhythm section and then I go from the rhythmic to the melodic: the conga to the bass, then to the marimba, then to the trumpets, maybe at the end, the vocals. But I go four to eight bars throughout the entire song. The main process, after I have recorded and programmed everything, is cutting and looping and arranging in Pro Tools.”

Working under myriad aliases since the early ’90s, Schmidt has produced numerous albums varying in style from glitch to pure techno to Latin. Around the World is a follow-up of sorts to Señor Coconut’s El Baile Aleman (Emperor Norton, 2000), which covered the music of German electronic innovators Kraftwerk. Using his labor-intensive cut-and-paste aesthetic, Schmidt imbues the classic club hits of Daft Punk, Prince, and Eurythmics (as well as Les Baxter and Perez Prado) with frenetic Latin fever on Around the World.

“For songs like ‘Pinball Chacha’ or ‘Kiss,’ I come up with a guide template, a basic 4-, 6-, or 8-bar loop,” Schmidt explains. “Once the song is arranged, I know what type of accent or rhythms are needed in each part of the song. Very often I switch from double tempo to half tempo, or I adjust the accents within the beat. As the track progresses, I try to find better-fitting samples, recordings [of the 1950s Latin variety], or I add live performances. If not, I program the rhythms very simply, maybe using Native Instruments Battery and the internal MIDI provided by Pro Tools. I program the rhythms and record live percussion over that. Then when I get all the melodic and harmonic information and vocals together, I go bar by bar, looping 4- or 8-bar segments and cutting everything within those bars. I cut them into pieces, and after I decide on the core elements of the rhythm section, I cut all the other elements around that core element.”

Not content to work solely in the box, Schmidt employs his “orchestra,” which consists of eight musicians (brass, reeds, percussion) based in Cologne, Germany. They often replicate a Tito Puente or Perez Prado sample, anything from a timbale solo to a full brass section shout chorus. Schmidt layers the live instrumentation, samples, and programming with the kind of meticulous attention to detail that has become his trademark.

“To me,” Schmidt confides, “making music is not about being organic or free; it always comes down to control and shaping things that you can generate in different ways. There has to be a human being giving it a certain shape and controlling it.”

(For a free download of “Pinball Chacha,” see the online bonus material at emusician.com.)

Home bases: Santiago, Chile and Cologne, Germany

Sequencer of choice: Digidesign Pro Tools LE 6.4

Go-to drum plug-in: Native Instruments Battery

Web site: senor-coconut.com

Source:emusician.com

The Latest Pro Tools ???

ptmp8_callout


Get ready for a revolutionary new way to work with Pro Tools® software. Pro Tools M-Powered™ 8 delivers a streamlined, customizable interface along with many new production tools and creative options. Work with up to 48 stereo audio tracks*. Create with five new A.I.R. instruments and 30 more plug-in effects. Create sophisticated notation with the new Score Editor based on the Sibelius engine. Work MIDI magic with the new MIDI Editor. Change audio pitch with the new Elastic Pitch real-time pitch transposer. It’s time to upgrade to the most powerful version of Pro Tools M-Powered ever.

  • 48 stereo audio tracks* > up to 2 times more audio tracks
  • dedicated MIDI Editor window > greatly simplifies and streamlines MIDI sequencing
  • includes 5 new A.I.R. virtual instruments and 30 more plug-in effects > inspiring creative tools
  • powerful new Score Editor window > based on Sibelius notation engine
  • beautiful, redesigned user interface > new enhancements and customizability
  • elastic Pitch real-time pitch transposition > complements Elastic Time time-stretching
  • incredible new track compositing workflow > easily construct a perfect performance from multiple takes
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The Alesis DM5 Pro Kit: Practice Quiet Play Loud!

April 9, 2009

dm5

The Alesis DM5 Pro Kit is a complete high quality electronic drum kit.

It delivers professional sound and familiar, comfortable playability thanks to durable, real drum heads. The DM5 Pro’s quick setup and easy portability are complemented by a versatile sound selection. With the DM5 Pro Kit, drummers can practice quietly with headphones, or get as loud as they need on-stage by connecting to an amplifier. The flexibility of the DM5 Pro Kit functions insures that it performs equally well for recording or live gigs.

The DM5 Pro Kit features a self-contained, 5-piece electronic drum set including a dual-zone snare, kick, 3 toms, with ride, crash and HiHat cymbal pads. In addition, the DM5 Pro Kit includes a heavy duty HiHat foot pedal along with an updated, rack-mounted, programmable DM5 sound module with a stunning 540 percussion sounds and 21 pre-programmed drum/percussion sets. Alesis’ proprietary Dynamic Articulation™ feature powers the DM5 Pro Kit’s drum sounds to respond instantly to the force with which a pad is struck, for the most realistic and accurate playback possible.

Step into the world of professional electronic percussion with the Alesis DM5 Pro kit.

alesis_dm5prokit

Features

  • Snare, kick, 3 toms, with ride, crash and HiHat cymbal pads.
  • Alesis Professional DM5 module containing:
  • 540 sounds
  • 21 programmable drum sets recorded in 48kHz, true stereo, with ambient effects
  • Single rack space module
  • Dynamic Articulation™ feature allows drum sounds to change volume, tone, and pitch depending on how hard they’re hit – just like real drums
  • Ultra-fast trigger-to-MIDI converter with 12 trigger inputs, 5 programmable parameters for each trigger
  • Natural movement motion cymbals and HiHat controller pedal for realistic open/close control

Specifications

  • Audio Outputs: 4 (2 stereo pairs)
  • Trigger Input Jacks: 12 (each with 5 user adjustable trigger parameters)
  • DAC Bit Resolution: 18
  • Sample Rate: 48kHz
  • Sounds: Over 500; includes stereo samples with reverb, ambience and dynamic articulation
  • Polyphony: 16 voice
  • Panning: 7 position, user programmable
  • Velocity Response: 127 levels of loudness via MIDI or trigger inputs
  • Kits: 21 Memory locations w/defaults permanently stored in ROM
  • MIDI Jacks: In, Out/Thru
  • Headphone Jack: 1/4″ TRS w/variable gain
  • Switchable Footswitch Jack: 1/4″ jack can be assigned to hi-hat or program advance mode
  • Tuning Scheme: Coarse (chromatic) and Fine (cents)
  • Data Input: Data knob, front panel keypad (sound auditioning via velocity sensitive Preview button on front panel)
  • Expanded Dynamic Articulation™: Modulates tone and pitch
  • Power: 9 VAC external transformer, UL and CSA approved
  • Dimensions: (WxHxD) 19″x1.75″x6″
  • Weight: 4.5 lbs.

Includes Stagg DT-25 Drum Throne:

Stagg DT-25 Drum Throne

This single braced drum stool represents great quality and value for money. With an adjustable height of between 600mm-620mm (adjustable in 300mm steps) and between 430mm-550mm when the shaft is reversed (ideal for children), this is a very versatile stool, also ideal for use with pianos.

The padded round seat measures 28cm in diameter and is covered in black vinyl. The 3 sturdy legs feature non slip feet to keep this stool in place

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Musikmesse Frankfurt: Novation SL MkII (Video) Novation’s next step

April 3, 2009

Novation have updated their SL range of USB/MIDI controllers, with the release of mark two versions of all four models in the range: the Zero SL, the 25SL, the 49SL and the 61SL. Key new features (excuse the pun) include better visual feedback, and more robust build quality.

The most noticeable difference between old and new SLs, however, is the omission of one of the wide LCDs from the latter. This, say Novation, doesn’t restrict the SL MkII’s visible feedback capabilities for a number of reasons. Firstly, new translucent, backlit buttons enable the user to get more information from the controls themselves (on the SL MkI series, the buttons are made from grey plastic and give no visual feedback). Secondly, LED rings around the topmost rotary encoders provide even more visual information for the user. But most importantly, the SL MkIIs are the first controllers in Novation’s range to ship with version three of Automap, their controller interface software. This features what the developers call a Heads-up GUI, a software representation of the layout of the SL MkII’s controls. Other new features of the mark two SLs include touch-sensitive controllers and updated drum pads.

At the time of writing, prices for the new range were still to be confirmed, but they should be shipping by the beginning of May.

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Livid’s Ohm64: Love Child of a Monome and a DJ-VJ Mixer Controller?

March 20, 2009

Look out, Akai APC40. There’s another contender in the emerging Controller With Lots of Buttons And Also Faders and Knobs and Crossfader product category. Livid’s Ohm64 combines the light-up button grid with faders, knobs, trigger buttons, and most importantly, unique customization options and a lovely wooden case. What’s unique about this one:

  • High-end materials: anodized aluminum faceplate, “immersion gold-platted circuit boards” (guess that’s circuit bling), an optional wooden body (aluminum is available, as well, but wood is more fun).
  • Not mass-market: hand-assembled, small-production Austin creation.
  • Fully class-compliant, no drivers (also true of the APC as far as I know, but nice – and ideal for Linux, too, in case you want to run this with a netbook or a Pd-running souped-up *nix laptop)
  • Open-source, customizable MIDI talkback: when you’re ready to customize just how those LEDs light up, there are included open source tools and fully programmable MIDI mapping

Bonus: it comes with a powerful, full-featured VJ app in the box, Cell DNA, though of course you can use it with anything you like.

The real story to me is the customization. Whereas the APC40 is entirely proprietary in design, has evidently limited MIDI mappings, and a mysterious mechanism for programming two-way communication, the Ohm64 is open, open source, and software-agnostic. If the open source thing catches on, that could mean a community of friendly folk thinking of smart ways to reprogram this thing for different apps. Ironically, that means that in the long run, the Ohm64 could wind up with better Ableton Live integration than the hardware Ableton chose to back – though all bets are off until we get these devices in our hands.

I would say the APC is probably more direct competition for the Ohm64 than the Monome, despite the 8×8 light-up buttons. The Monome is much lighter and slimmer, it takes a minimalist approach (no big knobs or faders), and uses OpenSoundControl in place of MIDI. The Ohm64 seems likely to appeal to those who weren’t Monome fans, and visa versa. And some lucky ducks are naturally going to own both.

But the important thing is that the Ohm64 joins the Monome in its crusade for open-source customization of a commercial product. Whatever the Ohm64 is when it ships, it’s that question of what people can do with it that may determine its real value. I have no doubt people will be reverse engineering the APC40, too — starting with figuring out how to fake the hardware “handshake” it uses so other devices can emulate it in Live. But it’ll be interesting to see how these different philosophies pan out, so to speak.

We’ll keep you posted….

Souce:  Create Digital Music


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Pro Tools M-Powered 8 Software Upgrade – Step Up to the Most Powerful Pro Tools M-Powered Software Ever

February 20, 2009

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  • 48 stereo audio tracks* > up to 2 times more audio tracks
  • dedicated MIDI Editor window > greatly simplifies and streamlines MIDI sequencing
  • includes 5 new A.I.R. virtual instruments and 30 more plug-in effects > inspiring creative tools
  • powerful new Score Editor window > based on Sibelius notation engine
  • beautiful, redesigned user interface > new enhancements and customizability
  • elastic Pitch real-time pitch transposition > complements Elastic Time time-stretching
  • incredible new track compositing workflow > easily construct a perfect performance from multiple takes
Get ready for a revolutionary new way to work with Pro Tools® software. Pro Tools M-Powered™ 8 delivers a streamlined, customizable interface along with many new production tools and creative options. Work with up to 48 stereo audio tracks*. Create with five new A.I.R. instruments and 30 more plug-in effects. Create sophisticated notation with the new Score Editor based on the Sibelius engine. Work MIDI magic with the new MIDI Editor. Change audio pitch with the new Elastic Pitch real-time pitch transposer. It’s time to upgrade to the most powerful version of Pro Tools M-Powered ever.

Stunning New Look and Interactivity

With a sleek new look, Pro Tools M-Powered 8 is as easy on the eyes as it is to use. All of the Pro Tools M-Powered functionality you know and love is still in place—now with double the inserts per channel, more customizability, easier access to editing options and more. Customize the toolbar to show only your favorite tools, and rearrange them the way you want. Tile or cascade your window arrangement. Change the color of your channel strips, tracks, regions, groups and markers to any hue. Navigate through sessions quickly using the Universe view. And with the QuickStart dialog, you can jump right into an existing session, quickly create a new session from scratch, or start from one of the new session templates.

A Well-Stocked Studio

Pro Tools M-Powered 8 comes fully packed with a huge, comprehensive collection of music creation and sound processing plug-ins—giving you a well-stocked studio right out of the box. Create and play music with groundbreaking new virtual instruments, including the Mini Grand piano, Boom™ drum machine, DB-33 tone-wheel organ, and Vacuum and Xpand!2™ synths. Dial-up awesome guitar tone with Eleven™ Free and SansAmp. Play DJ with Torq® LE. Add character to tracks with 20 new A.I.R. effects. Make music with nearly 8GB of pro-quality loops. And with dozens of professional sound processing plug-ins and tools at your disposal, you can fix, enhance and polish your mixes with ease. See the complete list.

More Tracks Than Ever

Pro Tools M-Powered 8 expands the power of your current hardware interface, allowing you to work with up to 48 mono or stereo audio tracks. You can also add Music Production Toolkit 2 to create huge mixes with up to 64 mono or stereo audio tracks.

Score Your Music

Based on the Sibelius notation engine, the new Score Editor lets you view, edit, arrange and print MIDI data as music notation. Whether you want to compose music using the notation tools—or transcribe recorded, imported, drawn (with the Pencil tool) or step-entered MIDI data into notation—the Score Editor features everything you need and nothing you don’t. Write parts on a single staff—treble, bass, alto, or tenor clef—or grand staff. Place and edit notes, and edit the meter and key signature at whim. Add chord symbols such as Dm7 and guitar chord diagrams to sessions. Transcribe MIDI parts in real time. Print out a score in its entirety or print only certain instrumental parts. You can even export sessions as Sibelius (.sib) files for further finessing in Sibelius.

Complete MIDI Production

Pro Tools M-Powered 8 features a comprehensive array of new MIDI tools to streamline production with both virtual and traditional instruments. Gain extensive MIDI editing power through MIDI Editor windows, which can display MIDI and automation data for Instrument, MIDI and Auxiliary Input tracks. Work with new features that let you separate, consolidate and mute MIDI notes; scrub and shuttle through parts; view superimposed MIDI and Instrument tracks for easier arrangement editing; color code MIDI notes by track, type, or velocity; audition velocity changes; and play MIDI notes when tabbing. Edit MIDI automation and continuous controller (CC) data through multiple Automation and Controller lanes. You can even watch your musical handiwork scroll by in real time during playback.

Transpose Audio with Elastic Pitch

As a complement to Elastic Time, Pro Tools M-Powered 8 introduces Elastic Pitch, which allows you to you to effortlessly manipulate or correct the pitch of any audio region in real time, right inside the Edit window. Easily transpose an entire audio region in semitones +/- four octaves without affecting its timing or tempo. Fix a less-than-perfect vocal performance by altering the pitch of individual notes in cent intervals. You can also create cool sound effects by linking pitch changes with time compression/expansion using the Varispeed algorithm.

Comp Tracks to Perfection

Creating flawless performances is easier than ever with Pro Tools M-Powered 8. New track compositing features let you quickly and easily piece together the best possible version of a performance from multiple recording passes. Simply loop-record multiple takes on an Audio track, view and audition the takes in Playlist view, select the best parts from the track’s alternate playlists, and copy them to the main playlist with a single click. You can also rate regions on a scale of one to five to help identify which takes you like the most when compositing playlists.

New Editing and Mixing Capabilities

With Pro Tools M-Powered 8, your system has even more editing and mixing capabilities. Lock regions to the timeline to prevent them from being inadvertently moved or edited. Use the Automation and Controller lanes to view and edit track automation (such as volume, pan and plug-in automation) and MIDI CC data (such as velocity, pitch bend and modulation) without changing track views. And with ten inserts to play with per track, you can now use more plug-ins than ever before.

Expanded Hardware Control

Pro Tools M-Powered 8 deepens its integration with hardware controllers such as M-Audio® ProjectMix I/O and Digidesign® Command|8®. Now you can map plug-in parameter controls to almost any encoder on your controller, and access each track’s ten inserts.

More Great New Features

Pro Tools M-Powered 8 is chock full of many other amazing new features that’ll help you become more efficient, inspire your creativity and provide more flexibility for your workflow needs. For example, the new Check for Updates feature keeps Pro Tools M-Powered and your plug-ins up to date with the latest and greatest revisions. There’s also support for files up to 4GB in size, letting you work with longer files with higher sample rates. You’ll find even more with the most powerful update to Pro Tools M-Powered yet.


*Up to 64 simultaneous stereo or mono audio tracks with the Music Production Toolkit 2 option. Owners of the original Music Production Toolkit software option who upgrade to Pro Tools M-Powered 8 will automatically get support for up to 64 stereo audio tracks.

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Artist Profile: DJ Daedelus

February 4, 2009

57125-500-343
Alfred Darlington isn’t your average cookie-cutter musician. From how he looks (early Victorian Dandism), to how he makes music, to how he expresses himself and views the world, his is a very individual, a ‘bespoke’ outlook.

Long established (and sometimes derided) as an electronic producer with whimsical, jazz-like sensibilities, Daedelus often plays with genre, from the summery samba sweep of 2006’s Denies the Day’s Demise to the bubbly avant-hop of 2003’s Rethinking the Weather and 2004’s Exquisite Corpse (all on Mush records). In 2008, he’s tackling rave music — specifically the “zoo rave” and hardcore/pre-jungle styles of the early ’90s — which he calls “my little temple, my little altar.”

“I’ve been collecting these records since ’92, when I was too young to know what I was putting my hands on, but I just liked the sound. And I’ve been buying them ever since,” says Daedelus. “Finally, I feel comfortable enough after this many years of releasing records to make a stab at it.”

The result is a pair of impressive releases. In January, influential L.A. imprint Alpha Pup issued Live at Low End Theory, a document of a Daedelus’ performance at the popular Los Angeles event. Throughout the 60-minute disc, Daedelus tweaks a Monome, a small MIDI device designed by engineers Brian Crabtree and Kelli Cain, that’s connected via USB cable to a MacBook running a Cycling ’74 Max/MSP software program with the OSC protocol. The setup allows him to chop up dozens of tracks from his decade-long discography, remixing them into a furiously imaginative set.

Alfred was born in Santa Monica in 1977 to an artist mother and psychologist father. Musical from very early on, as a child he was classically and jazz-trained in a number of instruments, but his interests were broad and varied – less a prodigy than a renaissance boy whose obsessions ranged from Greek legend to the mountains of Wales. As a 15 year old he finally persuaded his parents to take him to the Principality. Whilst in a YMCA in London he flipped the radio dial, found a pirate radio station and taped some UK rave and hardcore. “It was my first ‘Eureka!’ moment in music,” he says.

Back in the US he joined local rock bands, jazz bands and ska bands, which he enjoyed but felt limited by,too. At home he was listening to Warp, Ninja and your harder electronic stuff. He started DJing out the more leftfield side of drum and bass and making his own rudimentary productions. They were meant to be drum & bass but they kept turning out different and from his outsider’s experiments his own style was born. He chose the name Daedelus as he had a childhood obsession with invention, and what was he doing, after all, if not tinkering and fiddling and experimenting like the “gentleman inventors” of old?

In 1999 he started DJing on Dublab.com for his “Entropy Sessions” and began dropping in his own early demo productions. Carlos Nino (of ammoncontact) had the show after him and usually pushed Alfred out the studio as quickly as possible as he was not so into Daedelus’ confrontational DJ style, but when he heard a tranquil Daedelus production he took, in typical Nino style, Daedelus under his considerable wing around the LA scene. Nino placed Daedelus tracks on two influential compilations and then persuaded Plug Research to release his debut album, “Invention” in 2002, Remixers included Madlib, who later took Daedelus’ accordian parts and used them on the Madvillain record, closely followed by his “The Household” EP on Prefuse 73’s Eastern Developments label.

In 2003, he was booked to play a show in San Diego by Brian Crabtree and Peter Siegerstrong and they asked him to test out an early prototype of the Monome box. “It’s a Non-traditional electronic instrument,” Daedelus explains. “Basically it allows for massive improvisation.” Since then Daedelus has continued to use this revolutionary box, bringing much genuine liveness to the sometimes static world of performed electronic/dance music.

In 2003 he did “The Weather” album with Busdriver and Radioinactive and the remix album “Rethinking the Weather” on Mush records (home of cLOUDDEAD, also on Big Dada/Ninja Tune). 2004 saw the release of “Of Snowdonia” on Plug Research, the album with which Daedelus says he first “felt true artistic confidence, finding a true voice. I was finally in the right zone.”

There was certainly no let up in his creativity. Also in 2004 he released the concept album “A Gent Agent” on tiny German label Laboratory Instinct. The 2005 album “Exquisite Corpse” on Mush album featured the likes of TTC, Mike Ladd, MF Doom. Ninja signed Daedelus for UK/Europe (a relationship which has reached its full expression on “Love To Make Music To,” his first album for the label worldwide and put together with the help of their team). In 2006 “Denies the Days Demise” came out, a record showcasing his love of Brazilian music. Last year he released his first live album, “Live At the Low End Theory,” and “The Fairweather Friends EP”. Later this year will see the release of his collaboration with his wife, Laura Darling, as Long Lost!

And while his reputation has grown internationally, his place in the LA scene has also solidified. The musician that many of the hottest names in the city turn to for everything from bass clarinet licks to advice on obscure electronics, Daedelus has worked extensively with Taz from Sa-Ra, the pair of them opening for the likes of DJ Assault, Justice and Two Live Crew as well as appearing in Erykah Badu’s most recent video.

As for “Love To Make Music To,” Daedelus says that this album is “the imaginary memory of a time that never was! It’s my drug/love record, harking back to that time in the YMCA in London, when I first heard rave…”

Daedelusis a flagship user for the Monome, a small MIDI device designed by engineers Brian Crabtree and Kelli Cain, that’s connected via USB cable to a MacBook running a Cycling ‘74 Max/MSP software program with the OSC protocol. The setup allows him to chop up dozens of tracks from his decade-long discography, remixing them into a furiously imaginative set.

series

myspace.com/daedelusdarling
daedelusmusic.com
discogs.com/artist/Daedelus

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