Archive for the ‘Sound Cards’ Category

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The Top 10 Music Technology Websites On The Web

June 3, 2009

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1.  SOUND ON SOUND

http://www.soundonsound.com/

SOUND ON SOUND has consistently remained at the forefront of music technology since it was launched on Channel 4 TV’s The Tube in 1985 by the visionary SOS Publications Group, championing the convergence of MIDI, computer technology and recording equipment that continues to revolutionise the music production industry today.

The magazine is excellent and the website is no exception!

sos

2. YOU TUBE

Youtube can teach you lots of useless and wondeful things, music technology and software is no exception. If you have query or a problem simply ask yOUTUBE and chances are 14YRD old from  Milwaukee will tell you eveything you need to know!2 Audio tuts+

youtubedol

3. Audio Tuts+

Audiotuts+ is an in depth blog for musicians, producers and audio junkies! It features tutorials on the tools and techniques to record, produce, mix and master tracks. Audiotuts+ also features weekly articles for the music obsessive. Our commisisoned tutorials are written by industry experts and professionals, but anyone with an awesome skill to showcase can contribute a post and  pay $150 if we publish it.

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4. MUSIC RADAR

Like a few of the sites who are on this list, Musicradar.com is not exclusively about guitars, but a good amount of their features, including news, reviews and tutorials focus on guitars and are all of excellent quality, making this another essential stop. And their lists of the most outrageous guitars are simply hilarious…check them out!

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5. REMIX MAG

Endles resource of information. Remix educates DJs, engineers, producers, and performers of electronic music about the latest applications and new products specific to the electronic and urban music markets. Remix is the premier consumer magazine in North America dedicated 100 percent to the tools, techniques, and production syles of electronic and urban artists

remix

6. HARMONY CENTRAL

Harmony Central is generally a great place for anyone interested in any sort of musical gear info: tons of resources including news, reviews and forums about synths, souncards, software and much more. Great user reviews section!

harmony

7. SYNTHTOPIA

Synthtopia is a portal devoted to electronic music.There are lots of electronica sites, but they all seem to cover one tiny aspect of electronica: trance, classical electronic music, dance, or synthesizers. Synthtopia covers it all.

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8.  eMUSICIAN

EM is the premiere resource for musicians interested in personal-music production. EM consistently publishes the most “how-to” applications and reviews-a real benefit for the recording musician. Our editors react quickly to changes in the industry to deliver the in-depth technical expertise and tools necessary to successfully use new concepts and technology.Being an American publication  this could be the first place you hear news!4 http://www.kaosaudio.com

Kaos Audio is a huge database of audio software and news, books, synth presets, samples and loops libraries, video software, links, interesting free soft and much more for all the audiophiles out there.

emusicain

9. KAOSS AUDIO

Kaos Audio is a huge database of audio software and news, books, synth presets, samples and loops libraries, video software, links, interesting free soft and much more for all the audiophiles out there.

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10. COMPUTER MUSIC

CM and its similar sites (Futuremusic etc) have  vast array of reviews articles and good image content

CM

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24-bit/96kHz USB Mic Preamp – No batteries. No latency. No headaches. Just plug in and record.

January 2, 2009

micport-pro-side-200micport-pro-other-side-2001

24-bit/96kHz USB Mic Preamp

No batteries. No latency. No headaches. Just plug in and record.

MicPort Pro from CEntrance is a 24-bit/96kHz broadcast quality USB mic preamp used by the BBC, CNN, NBC, CBS, ABC, and voiceover professionals. MicPort Pro is your mic-to-computer audio interface, compatible with Windows XP/Vista, Mac OS X 10.4 and above, and LINUX. MicPort Pro features 48V phantom power, a loud headphone output for zero latency monitoring, and aggregation that allows you to record in stereo with two MicPort Pro units. Even test & measurement guys love it with MicPort Pro’s SMAART v.6 compatibility.

No batteries. No latency. No headaches. Just plug in and record.

Andy Hong in TapeOp

“The biggest headaches we get trying to capture that elusive, magic moment always stem from fear of a poor recording. MicPort Pro is a permanent cure for that headache.”

“If you’re looking for a quick, easy, and very portable mic’ing system with high-quality sound for your laptop or desktop, the MicPort Pro should be on your shortlist…”

Harlan Hogan and Jeffrey Fisher in their book,
Voice Actor’s Guide to Recording at Home

“Now, any mic you own or purchase in the future can be a USB mic. The preamp is clean, clear and natural sounding, and the A/D audio interface is quiet so you record your voice, not the electronics. This is one amazingly handy device at an equally amazing low price.”

Tom Phillips in Post

“I set up a test comparing it [MicPort Pro] to a Grace Design 201 preamp recording into Cakewalk Sonar 6 on my PC, and then replayed the same parts using the same microphones fed through the MicPort Pro and Garage Band. For microphones I used a Neumann U87 (condenser) and a Coles 4038 (ribbon). In general, I would say that the MicPort Pro compared incredibly well. At times it was difficult to hear any difference at all.”

Record Anytime, Anywhere

At home or on the road, MicPort Pro’s compact, USB-powered design offers maximum audio fidelity and minimal system configuration. Protected by a rugged chassis, MicPort Pro’s Class A preamp and low-noise circuitry preserves high-quality audio.

The onboard headphone jack delivers zero-latency monitoring via direct circuit. Mic gain and headphone volume adjustment couldn’t be easier with MicPort Pro’s two conveniently located rotary controls.

MicPort Pro A/D and D/A Converters

MicPort Pro uses high performance 24-bit A/D and D/A converters. The ADC has an Enhanced Dual Bit architecture with wide dynamic range. The DAC uses the newly developed Advanced Multi Bit architecture and achieves low noise and high jitter tolerance by use of SCF (switched capacitor filter) techniques.

Applications (click for more)

* Broadcasting and interviewing (including stereo & ribbon mics)
* Voiceovers
* Vocal recording and overdubs
* Instrument and amplifier miking
* Test and measurement
* Video production
* Podcasting

Finally, a Compact USB Interface that Plugs Right into Your Microphone

* 24-bit/96kHz performance
* Loud headphone amp level control for zero-latency monitoring
* 48V phantom power internally generated based on 5V of input so even condenser mics can be used with laptops
* Low-noise mic preamp with input level control knob
* High quality analog to digital (A/D) conversion
* USB bus powered – no batteries or external power supply needed
* Rugged anodized aluminum construction
* 6′ (1.83m) USB cable included

Compatibility

* Any condenser, ribbon or dynamic mic
* Windows XP and Vista
* Mac OSX 10.4 and above
* USB 1.1 and 2.0

Complimentary Software Downloads for MicPort Users

* CEntrance Universal Driver™ allows for recording in stereo with multiple MicPorts
* REAPER™ multi-track recording and editing software (trial version)

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Introducing the UGM 96 from ESI – 2-in/2-out portable USB audio interface

December 3, 2008
Introducing the UGM 96 from ESI





2-in/2-out portable USB audio interface


The new UGM96 is one of the most portable audio interface with this feature set on the market.

Even smaller than the new U24 XL, the UGM96 offers an extremely portable guitar and microphone to USB interface. This unit allows you to connect two guitars (via the Hi-Z instrument inputs) or one guitar and one microphone simultaneously to your PC or Mac.

The rear side offers a stereo output that you can use for monitoring, i.e. with headphones. This makes UGM96 the perfect companion for guitar recording applications on the road or in your studio. You can use it to jam with a guitar and microphone, process the signal with your PC or Mac notebook or desktop in realtime and listen to the mix directly via headphones – no special adapters or extra power supplies are needed. You simply plug UGM96 between your guitar, headphones, the microphone and your computer. It´s unbelievable how many functions are provided by this small stylish device.



Features

2 x analog input and 2 analog output channels
2 independent mono Hi-Z inputs
One Hi-Z input switchable to microphone input with preamp
2 headphone outputs
One headphone output can work as line output
Fully USB bus powered
Drivers for Windows Vista/XP with ASIO support with low latency
Core Audio support under Mac OS X 10.4 and higher
Dimensions: around 7 cm x 6 cm

Bundled with Cubase LE 4 and Studio Devil Virtual Guitar Amp

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Christmas Gift Suggestion: E-mu USB Audio Interface

December 2, 2008

tnl_emu0404usb

The E-MU 0404 USB 2.0 Audio/MIDI Interface delivers an unparalleled level of audio performance to your PC with premium 24-bit/192kHz A/D and D/A converters, pristine XTC mic/line/hi-Z preamps, ultra-low jitter clock and rock-solid stability.

From its plug-and-play functionality and hands-on ergonomic design to professional features and signal-to-noise specs that are simply unmatched by any other USB interface on the market, the E-MU 0404 USB will forever change your expectations of USB audio. The E-MU 0404 USB also ships with the E-MU Production Tools Software Bundle that includes E-MU’s Proteus VX, as well as software by Cakewalk, Steinberg, Ableton, IK Multimedia, and many more – everything you need to create, record, edit and master your music.



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e-mu_0404_usb_inputs_and-04

e-mu_0404_usb_inputs_and-06:

  • Premium 24-bit/192kHz A/D and D/A converters (A/D: 113dB SNR, D/A: 117dB SNR) deliver unmatched USB audio fidelity
  • E-MU XTC Class-A ultra-low noise Mic/Line/Hi-Z preamplifiers (-127dB EIN) with 48V phantom power and ground lift switches enable you to plug microphones, keyboards and guitars straight into your computer with professional results, while the built-in analog soft limiting circuit lets you record a hotter signal without fear of clipping
  • Comprehensive digital I/O with optical and coaxial S/PDIF (switchable to AES/EBU) and MIDI In/Out to easily connect all of your digital studio gear and instruments
  • Ultra-low latency Windows XP and x64 USB 2.0 drivers offer accurate timing and playback of your recorded audio and software instruments
  • Hardware zero-latency direct monitoring (mono/stereo) allows you to record and overdub with no annoying delay
  • Plug-and-play operation with hands-on control of all major functions like master level, direct monitoring, preamplifier controls and more
  • Compatibility with most popular audio/sequencer applications (ASIO2, WDM, MME – AC3 and DTS Passthru supported)
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Why do I need a Microphone Preamp?

November 25, 2008

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A condenser microphone works by actually converting sound energy into an electrical voltage, but this voltage is much lower than the voltage coming out of your keyboard or other line level sources.  If you plug a condenser microphone in to audio interface then the signal it generates will be very quiet unless the signal is boosted. This is why you will need for a preamp.

On a consumer (internal) sound card you will have a mic preamp, but it’s only designed for speech and cheap mic–totally unsuitable for audio recording.

You can add a Microphone Preamps to your set up via:

productline6ux2largeOn the bottom of this page you will see a lot of different preamps that will boost a microphone signal without adding lots of noise.  We have Pre Amps for every budget, however, bear in mind that the Mic Pre is one of the most important links of the chain that will effect the sound quality of your recording system.

Phantom Power

“Phantom powering” is a method of providing power to microphones by applying a voltage to the same wires that carry the audio signals. Phantom power can be generated from mixing consoles, mic preamplifiers, or in-line phantom power supplies.

In general, phantom voltages are used to power electronics within condenser microphones. Condenser microphones require power for various parts of their operation, including impedance converters, preamplifier circuitry and, in some cases, to polarized microphone capsules. Phantom is usually a DC voltage ranging from 12 to 48 volts. Microphones draw current from this voltage based on their needs.

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Optimizing Your System, Improving Performance and Managing Latency

November 10, 2008

So you bought an audio recording interface, followed all the instructions, and set everything up. Now what? In this article, we cover some measures you can take to optimize your system for maximum recording performance, prevent audio dropouts and manage latency.

A typical PC or Mac recording setup may contain software and hardware products from a dozen or more companies such as Apple, Steinberg, MOTU, FXpansion, Native Instruments, Akai Professional, and Alesis. Even with a minimalist setup, getting all the separate hardware and software components to work together smoothly can be tricky. One component’s manual might not pick up exactly where the other one left off, and there are very few manuals, which will discuss how to optimize your system over-all for the best performance. In this article, will cover some measures you can take to optimize your system for maximum recording performance, prevent audio-dropouts and manage latency.

You can’t walk into a car dealership and buy a car that’s ready to enter a race. Even high-performance sports cars come tuned for the road, not the racetrack. The suspension, gearing, and timing all need to be tweaked before a car is ready to be pushed to their limits.

The same is true of computers. While most new computers will perform well right out of the box, whether you buy a Mac, or a PC, you still have some work to do before you’ll see your new computer perform to its maximum potential. Recording and mixing music is one of the most demanding tasks you can ask of your computer, sometimes more taxing than professional graphics and video work.

The suggestions below can be used to squeeze more speed, more tracks, and more plug-in power out of any computer. Before you begin, make sure that your recording software and your audio device drivers are up-to-date.

1. Don’t let your computer’s boot drive get too full.
Make sure to leave about 20% of your computer’s main hard disk free for system tasks and virtual memory operations. This is crucial to maintain system speed. If your main hard disk gets more than 80% full, it is time to go out and buy a second hard disk, or either get rid of some files. External USB and FireWire drives are more affordable than ever. Internal drives are even less expensive! While you’re at it, buy an extra drive just for backing up!

2. Get more RAM.
Your operating system can use up to 1GB of RAM all by itself. On a recording computer, you’ll want to have more than that so your power-hungry applications have all the resources they need. 2GB is a great place to start. If you’ll be using lots of virtual instruments, samplers, and other sound generators, you’ll want to get even more…think 3 or 4GB. Is there such thing as overkill? At this point, yes, there is. While many of today’s computers can accommodate 8GB or more RAM, even in virtual instrument and sample-heavy projects, it’s almost impossible to use up that much RAM. For the most part, the only time you’ll need 8GB of ram is in video and 3D-modeling applications.

3. Record to a second hard disk.
While even the 5,400 RPM drives in most laptops can handle recording eight or even 16 simultaneous tracks, you can really improve system performance by dedicating a 7,200 or 10,000 RPM drive to your recording projects. Certain files on your computer change all the time, such as your email, internet search history, and bookmarks. Other files stay more or less the same. These include music and photo libraries, amd large audio files. Your system will perform better and won’t have to work as hard if you get a second drive to record on. This will result in less fragmented drive space, and faster loading and writing of large files. This is also makes things easier when it comes to backing up.

4. Use the best ports on your computer for recording devices.
If you have a desktop or a tower, be sure to connect your audio interface to a port that is on the back of the computer. Generally, ports on the front of the computer, on the monitor, or keyboard don’t perform as well as those on the back. This can help prevent noise, dropouts and connection issues. Not all FireWire ports are considered equal. If the port on your computer performs poorly, or your device has problems being recognized, consider purchasing a new FireWire card. If you use a USB hub to connect your device, use a hub that has its own AC power adapter. If necessary, upgrade to a premium USB cable. If you are in an area that has a high level of radio or electrical interference, and you experience noise or hum when using USB audio, upgrade your USB cable to a premium cable with extra shielding and a ferrite bead (a cylindrical bump on one end of the cable), which can filter out some external noise.

5. Optimize Windows XP (Mac users can skip this one)
Make sure your Windows installation is up to date.
Keep in mind that the latest audio device drivers, and the latest recording software are designed on the most current version of XP. If your computer isn’t up to date, its performance will likely suffer. Go to windowsupdate.microsoft.com to update your system. It may take a few visits to the site to get all the fixes to the updates (install updates and then do the Windows Update scan again).

Minimize programs running in the background.The icons at the bottom-right of the screen, next to the clock represent most of the programs that are running in the background. This will include virus protection, spyware protection, and more. While recording, it is advisable to exit from these. Right-clicking any of these icons will bring up a menu. If there is a Close, Exit, or Quit option for any of these icons, choose it so that you have exited out of any background programs. You can double-check which applications and processes are running by looking at the Applications and Processes tabs of the Task Manager. (To access the Task Manager, press Ctrl+Alt+Delete, and then click Task Manager.)

Turn off Hard Disk Sleep. Make sure your hard drive is not set to sleep or turn off after a short amount of time. If your hard drive goes to sleep (stops spinning to save power) while you are recording, your recording will be interrupted. Click on the Start Menu at the bottom left of your screen and select Settings, then Control Panel. Open the Power Options control panel. Set the Turn Off Hard Disks option to Never.

Turn off Automatic Updates. It can be a good idea to turn off any scheduled tasks. The last thing you want is for a 150MB update to start downloading in the middle of a recording session. Open the Automatic Updates control panel, and select Turn off Automatic Updates. This means that its up to you to manually check for updates yourself. All you have to do is either revisit this Control Panel, or go to windowsupdate.microsoft.com.

Turn off wireless networking. Wireless networking can sometimes interfere with or interrupt recording. Wireless cards in computers automatically scan the airwaves for available networks. This takes up some of your system resources, and can sometimes hurt performance. If a removable wireless networking card is being used on a laptop, the card can simply be removed. If you are on a wireless network, and the card is internal, you can disable the card in the device manager while you record. Its easy to turn back on when you’re not recording.

Install the Microsoft fix for FireWire bandwidth

WinXP SP2 KB885222.

For additional tips on optimizing Windows XP, check out this excellent article.

6. Optimize Vista (Mac users can skip this one)
Disable graphical effects. When troubleshooting or optimizing system performance issues in Windows Vista, it is often a good idea to disable some or all of Vista’s graphical effects. While they look nice, these effects can actually be just as demanding, or more demanding on your computer’s system than many professional level programs available on the market. Performance on even the highest-end systems can suffer if too much demand is placed on the processor(s) at once. Disabling these graphical effects is one step towards getting the highest level of performance out of your existing computer.

To disable the aero effects:

1. Right+click the background picture on your computer’s desktop.
2. Select Personalize from the drop-down menu that appears.
3. In the window that opens, click on Window Color and Appearance.
4. The Window Color and Appearance control panel will open. Click on Open classic appearance properties for more color options.
5. A window titled Appearance Settings will open. Under Color scheme, select Windows Vista Basic.
6. Click Apply.
7. Click OK to close the Theme Settings window.
8. Close the Personalization control panel by clicking on the X in the upper-right corner of the window.
9. The borders of your windows will no longer be clear, freeing up system resources for other programs.

To free up even more system resources

1. Right+click the background picture on your computer’s desktop.
2. Select Personalize from the drop-down menu that appears.
3. In the window that opens, click on Theme.
4. The Theme Settings window will open. Under Theme, select Windows Classic from the drop-down menu.
5. Click Apply.
6. Click OK to close the Theme Settings window.
7. Close the Personalization control panel by clicking on the X in the upper-right corner of the window.

Minimize Programs running in the background. The icons at the bottom-right of the screen, next to the clock (mostly) represent programs that are running in the background. This will include virus protection spy-ware protection etc. While recording, it is advisable to exit from these. Right-clicking any of these icons will bring up a menu. If there is a Close, Exit, or Quit option for any of these icons, choose it so that you have exited out of any background programs. You can double-check what applications and processes are running by looking at the Applications and Processes tabs of the Task Manager. To access the Task Manager, press Ctrl+Alt+Delete, and then click Start Task Manager.

Turn off Automatic Updates. It can be a good idea to turn off any scheduled tasks. The last thing you want is for a 150MB update to start downloading in the middle of a recording session. Open the Windows Updates control panel. Then, on the left-hand side of the window, click Change Settings, then choose Never check for updates. This means that its up to you to manually check for updates yourself. All you have to do is either revisit this Control Panel, or go to windowsupdate.microsoft.com.

Turn off wireless networking. Wireless networking can sometimes interfere with or interrupt recording. Wireless cards in computers automatically scan the airwaves for available networks. This takes up some of your system resources, and can sometimes hurt performance. If a removable wireless networking card is being used on a laptop, the card can simply be removed. If you are on a wireless network, and the card is internal, you can disable the card in the device manager while you record. Its easy to turn back on when you’re not recording.

Set your Power Options to High Performance. In the Power Options, Control Panel, choose High Performance. Then click Change plan settings button, and set Put the computer to sleep to Never. Then click Save Changes. For additional tips on optimizing Windows Vista, check out this excellent article.

7. Macintosh Optimization Tips (Windows users can skip this one.)

Turn off System Sleep. In the Energy Saver System Preferences Panel, select the Sleep tab, and set the option titled Put the computer to sleep when its inactive for to Never.

Turn off Hard Disk Sleep. In the same System Preferences Panel, uncheck the option titled Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when possible.

Turn off AirPort. In the upper-right of the screen, next to the clock, click the AirPort icon, and select Turn AirPort Off. The airport automatically scans the airwaves for available networks. This takes up some of your system resources, and can sometimes hurt performance. Its easy to turn back on when you’re not recording.

Turn off Bluetooth. In the Bluetooth Preferences Panel, uncheck On, and uncheck Discoverable. Its easy to turn back on when youíre not recording.

Turn off Time Machine. If you use Time Machine to back up your computer (which is a great idea), turn it off when you’re recording. Your Mac may pick some inconvenient times to start a backup. Select the Time Machine System Preferences Panel, set Time Machine to OFF. Its easy to turn back on when you’re not recording.

Turn off unnecessary startup items. In the Accounts System Preferences Panel, under Login Items, uncheck any items you don’t need open everytime your system boots.

Quit any unnecessary applications. When recording, make sure to exit out of any programs unrelated to your current project. This will free up the most memory possible for your recording apps. You can monitor how much of your computer’s resources any program is using with the Activity Monitor Utility (located in Applications > Utilities).

8. Know what latency is and how it affects recording.
Every recording program has an options, settings or preferences page in which the user can adjust the buffer size. Buffer size governs the amount of time the computer is given to respond to requests (for audio processing in this case). The larger the buffer size, the more time the computer has to respond. Large buffer sizes allow the computer to handle more work, but at the cost of higher latency. Smaller buffer sizes reduce the overall amount of work the computer can handle, but it can do so with lower latency. Latency refers to the time it takes the computer to respond to input. If latency is high, signals routed into the computer and back out to speakers or headphones may be audibly delayed.

Buffer sizes should be adjusted in increments of 64 (64, 192, 128, 256, 512, 768, 1024 etc).

When is low latency important? A good example of latency is the time it takes for the computer to output a sound when a key is struck on a MIDI keyboard connected to it. In this situation, it is important to have low latency so that there is no audible delay between the time the key is struck, and when the note is heard.

Another situation in which it is important to have low latency is when using an amp-modeling plugin for guitar or bass. The guitarist or bassist plugs directly into the audio interface, and uses a software plugin to emulate the sound of a guitar amplifier. Any delay between the time the player plucks a string and the time the note is heard would be disruptive to the performance.

In the modern digital studio, these two situations are essentially the only times in which it is important to have very low latency and buffer sizes. Depending on the computer, a buffer size of 192, or 128 should result in very low latency suitable for the above situations. A properly configured iO|14 or iO|26 can exhibit latency as low as 6ms. The human ear cannot distinguish delays lower than 20-30ms.

When is low latency not important? All Alesis recording interfaces feature zero-latency input monitoring. This makes monitoring live audio sources like microphones, keyboards, basses, MPCs etc effortless. When monitoring inputs like these, do so using the audio interface’s zero-latency monitoring feature as opposed to monitoring through the recording software. This way latency is never a factor.

The Alesis iO|14 and iO|26 feature a sophisticated zero-latency monitoring utility – the Alesis HDM Control Panel. This gives you four completely independent monitor mixes! The MasterControl allows you to create a zero-latency monitor mix right on the control surface’s faders. You can instantly switch back and forth from monitor mix control, to software DAW control by pressing the Direct Monitor button. When switching form one mode to another, the motorized faders snap right back into position where you last left them. The MultiMix USB, iMultiMix USB, MultiMix USB 2.0, and MultiMix FireWire series of recording interfaces all feature integrated zero-latency analog mixers giving you full control over what you hear while you’re recording. The iO|2 features a Monitor Mix knob that allows you blend a zero-latency input signal into your mix.

The only situations in which it is necessary to monitor through the recording software (as opposed to the HDM) are described above: monitoring MIDI input through a software instrument, or monitoring guitar through an amp modeling plugin. When using the Alesis HDM Control Panel for your monitoring, you can set your buffer size to 1024 for maximum performance. This gives your computer more time to process things, which translates into more total tracks and plugins that can be handled.

We hope these eight steps will have you and your computer on the way to faster, easier, and better recordings. We take pride in helping recording engineers make better use of their tools with the aim of making great music and great recordings. Happy tracking!

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Getting my Guitar to my P.C. ?

November 4, 2008

One of the most requested pieces of information here at Musicians Tools is “How do I get my guitar into my P.C.”!


This is a qustion that in the past required quite a complex answer and one which was could be costly and of course is limited to your guitar equipment.
In other words if you only had a 15 w Peavy combo, that’s all you were recording with!
Not to mention needing the right Room, Microphones, Pre-amps and everything else that you come to expect from a recording chain.

Now using modern software based technology my  “Guitar rig” may comprise of a guitar, a lead, an audio interface and a laptop.

Here is some examples of the easiest way to get recording your guitar with outstanding results.

IK Multimedia StealthPlug Inc Amplitube 2 Live

Compact, cable-like, USB audio card for guitarists to plug into the world of software based amp and effects modeling. With an in-line guitar cable USB audio interface housing a 1/4” jack on one side and a USB port on the other, entering the world of software based amp and effects modeling is as simple as plugging your guitar into your computer. StealthPlug also includes volume adjustment buttons, indication LED, and a 1/8” stereo output for headphones, powered speakers, or an amp.

The perfect mobile solution for playing, recording, or practicing – anytime and anywhere.

Use AmpliTube Live, for playing and AmpliTube LE within your recording environment for the ultimate in flexibility. For live playing or practicing anywhere at any time, the StealthPlug is a complete guitar amp and effects modeling solution. Use the StealthPlug with AmpliTube Live and LE, in either plug-in or standalone format, with all major Mac and PC platforms.
Easy to use, just plug your guitar into your computer.

Install the software, connect the StealthPlug to your guitar and a USB port on your computer, and you’re ready to rock. There has never been an easier way to enter into the digital world of software based guitar amp and effects modeling..

Line 6 TonePort UX2

Featuring a graphical interface that most guitarists will find easy to understand

TonePort™ is like a rack full of premium tube recording equipment, plus a perfectly engineered recording room for guitar and bass, thanks to our acclaimed guitar/bass direct tone with mic and cab modeling. What else would you expect from the makers of the revolutionary POD® product family? TonePort even comes with a special version of the popular recording application Ableton Live created for Line 6 so you can start making great sounding recordings as soon as you open the box!GearBox™

The included GearBox™ software controls TonePort and gives you a premium tone front end for all your recordings. Includes meticulously crafted models of premium tube studio preamps, vintage guitar and bass rigs, and sought after, personality-rich effects. This is the tone that pros rely on and only Line 6 provides.  Now it comes to your desktop with TonePort.

ToneDirect™With Line 6’s exclusive ToneDirect™ monitoring, you get fully processed audio in real time while you track!  Far better than recording through plug-ins, it avoids the latency from your recording program and operating system.  ToneDirect also easily beats analog direct monitoring options that force you to record guitar without hearing the amp model and effects, or struggle to get an inspired vocal with no reverb!  With GearBox software and TonePort hardware, it’s easy to get amazing sounding recordings every time inspiration hits.

Just look at these specifications, this system is not only easy to use but a very powerful system featuring many inputs and and outputs for different applications

Specification

  • 2 Mic Inputs with +48v Phantom Power
  • 2 Guitar/Bass Inputs – use the Pad input for guitars and basses with high level pickup outputs, or the normal input
  • Stereo Line Inputs for your line out level gear
  • Stereo Digital Output S/PDIF via RCA
  • Stereo Line Outputs via balanced 1/4-inch
  • Stereo Monitor Input via stereo 1/4-inch jack
  • Headphone Output with independent volume knob
  • VU Meters assignable to input, record send, output and monitor levels
  • Footswitch Jacks send MIDI commands to recording programs (start/stop, punch in/out, etc.)
  • Pro Audio Performance with over 100dB signal-to-noise & dynamic range
  • Tone Direct™ monitoring – unique, full tone low latency monitoring regardless of recording software’s buffer size
  • 44.1 & 48KHz, 16 & 24 bit recording
  • 96KHz mode with built-in sample rate conversion for simultaneous input and output
  • USB-powered
  • Rock-solid Drivers: ASIO, WDM, Mac OS X

VOX JamVOX Jam and practice tool for Guitar

This new device is not only a guitar set up, a recording interface, a microphone pre amp and a full modelling suite but a computer audio monitor and full “Jam and practise tool ” for guitarists. Thi sinterace really can remove guitar and ‘reveal ‘guitar fro song sin your .mp3 collection allowing easier analysis of parts, a must for the eager musician

The JamVOX is an integrated monitor and software system that extracts the guitar from any MP3 and plugs you into the mix of their favorite bands.

JamVOX gives guitarists instant access to dozens of legendary amps and effects all in one easy to use “drag and drop” software interface. Revolutionary Guitar XTracktion (GXT) technology lets you remove the guitar part of your favorite song with the push of a button. Best of all, you can then take the lead yourself with instant rock star tone! Alternatively, you can extract or isolate the guitar part, slow down the tempo, and practice any style of music without changing the pitch.

The VOX JamVOX includes authentic software models, or recreations, of 19 famous guitar amps and 54 vintage and modern effects, so you’ll be able to perfectly reproduce the sounds of your favorite guitarists. JamVOX also comes with a dedicated full-range USB monitor speaker, so there’s no need for complex wiring or any specialized knowledge of computer music.

A two-CD 28-song bundle of guitar play-along tracks of famous songs, courtesy of Hal Leonard Corporation, is also included, with classic play-along songs such as Day Tripper by The Beatles, Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana, Hot For Teacher by Van Halen, Crossroads by Cream, Am I Evil? by Metallica, and many more.

JamVOX Software features:

  • 19 amp models ranging from vintage to modern: Virtual Valve Reactor even reproduces the operation of vacuum tube power amps including VOX AC15, VOX AC15TB, VOX AC30, and more.
  • 12 cabinet models that meticulously simulate the speaker response and cabinet design including VOX AC15, VOX AC30, VOX AD412, TWEED 1×8, TWEED 1×12, and more.
  • 54 high-quality effect models: 18 pedal-type, 12 modulation-type, 11 delay-type, 12 reverb, noise reduction including TUBE OD, ORANGE DIST, FUZZ, OCTAFUZZ, VOX WAH, ROTARY, TALK MOD REVERSE DELAY, ECHO PLUS Delay, reverbs and many more.
  • Drag and drop six effect units to freely specify their routing
  • More than 100 Guitar programs that include the guitar sounds of famous songs and guitarists
  • Pickup modeling function lets you produce the sounds of different pickups than those actually on the connected guitar
IK Multimedia StealthPlug Inc Amplitube 2 Live
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IK Multimedia StealthPlug Inc Amplitube 2 Live

Compact, cable-like, USB audio card for guitarists to plug into the world of software based amp and effects modeling. With an in-line guitar cable USB audio interface housing a 1/4” jack on one side and a USB port on the other, entering the world of software based amp and effects modeling is as simple as plugging your guitar into your…

Line 6 TonePort UX2

Professional producers, engineers, and musicians turn to Line 6 in studios around the world because they know that great mixes start with great recordings.  Now we’re introducing the world’s first line of recording & modeling interfaces with our pro grade tone for guitar, bass, vocals, and more. TonePort™ is like a rack full of premium tube recording equipment,…

Native Instruments Guitar Rig 3 – Kontrol Edition

The All-Inclusive, Professional Sound Equipment for Guitar and Bass: Guitar Rig 3 is the ultimate all-in-one guitar and bass solution. Simply connect your guitar with your computer via the enhanced Rig Kontrol 3 foot pedal and you are ready to go. The on-board studio-quality soundcard routes the signal to your speakers, while the software grants you access to…

VOX JamVOX Jam and practice tool for Guitar

The JamVOX is an integrated monitor and software system that extracts the guitar from any MP3 and plugs you into the mix of their favorite bands. JamVOX gives guitarists instant access to dozens of legendary amps and effects all in one easy to use “drag and drop” software interface. Revolutionary Guitar XTracktion (GXT) technology lets you remove the guitar part…

Buy Now More Info
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Source Distribution announces ‘One For The Road’ PreSonus FireStudio rebate scheme

July 15, 2008

Source Distribution announced its One For The Road rebate on selected PreSonus products. The brand-new summer promotion means that any customer in the UK or Ireland purchasing from the PreSonus FireStudio range between 1 June and 31 August 2008 will be eligible to receive a PreSonus Inspire 1394 mobile recording interface (worth £119) for free.

Free FireWire Mobile recording Interface

Free FireWire Mobile recording Interface

Now customers can run one PreSonus recording set-up permanently at home, and another that they can throw in a backpack or gig bag for mixing and recording on the road.

The FireStudio range comprises the original FireStudio 2626 FireWire recording interface, the FireStudio Tube (featuring two channels of tube preamp with analogue limiters), the 24-bit/96k FireStudio Project, and the FireStudio LightPipe ADAT-to-FireWire converter. Any purchase of one of these models from an authorised dealer in the UK or Ireland during the offer period will qualify for the rebate…so check the FireStudio range at Dolphin!

The Inspire 1394 is a pro-quality 24-bit/96k mobile FireWire recording interface designed to operate seamlessly with almost all Mac- and PC-compatible recording software. The unit includes two custom-designed mic preamps with +48V phantom power, two instrument Hi-Z inputs, and a variety of common output options. The Inspire comes complete with Cubase LE4 recording software and the PreSonus ProPak suite of plug-ins, samples and loops. Above all else, the Inspire 1394 is designed to be highly mobile and can be used in almost any recording situation.

To claim their free Inspire 1394, all the FireStudio purchaser has to do is visit the Source Distribution website, download and complete the rebate form, and return it to Source Distribution with their dealer sales receipt and the UPC barcode from the FireStudio product box. Some terms & conditions apply, as detailed on the rebate form.

To download the rebate form, simply visit www.sourcedistribution.co.uk/inspire

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Choosing a new AD/DA for your studio

February 28, 2007

Sonic State help choose a new AD/DA for Will Gregory, one half of Goldfrapp.They compare the Presonus Digimax FS – an 8 Channel mic pre equipped, unit, the Apogee Rosetta AD800 – again 8 channels of i/o, and the relatively unknown Lynx Aurora AD16 – a 16 channel system.

In the end Will decided that the Lynx Aurora was the one for him – the sound and the number of channels just made it the obvious option.

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M-Audio Unveils Groundbreaking New Products

February 15, 2007

With everything from DJ performance systems and multimedia speakers to soft synths and accessories, M-Audio is making waves at this year’s Winter NAMM show in Anaheim, Calif. New offerings include Torq Xponent, Studiophile™ AV 40, Studiophile AV 20, GForce Virtual String Machine, Way Out Ware KikAxxe, KeyRig 49 and more. If you can’t make it to the show floor to check out these exciting new products, read on for the full story.

Torq Xponent is a cutting-edge performance system that brings professional-grade control to the world of computer-based DJing. The package includes the Torq DJ software that’s revolutionizing digital DJing and the Xponent hardware control surface that puts all that power right at your fingertips. Compatible with Mac and PC.

The Studiophile™ AV 40 and AV 20 powered speakers use proven M-Audio technology in compact systems that are perfect for small spaces or for traveling musicians. The Studiophile AV 40 speakers feature 4” polypropylene-coated drivers, 3/4” silk dome tweeters, 20-watt-per-channel internal amplifier and OptImage III wave guides for punchy lows, crisp highs and an even response. And for more mobility, the AV 20 speakers include 2” composite woofers, 1” ferrofluid-cooled Mylar dome tweeters, internal amplification and them same OptImage III technology as the AV 40s.

With 500+ presets, the Virtual String Machine from GForce delivers expert emulations of over a dozen vintage string synthesizers. Layer any two of the 60 Sample Sets and apply synthesis to each—then add master vintage phaser/ensemble effects. Mac/PC stand-alone or host operation (RTAS, VST, AU).

Built with Way Out Ware’s award-winning analog-modeling technology, the KikAxxe brings together a faithful emulation of the classic ARP Axxe synthesizer, analog-style 16-step sequencer, programmable drum machine and a tape delay effect. Modern conveniences include presets, MIDI sync and comprehensive MIDI-mapping capabilities. Compatible with RTAS, VST and AU hosts. Mac/PC.

M-Audio KeyRig 49 turns your Mac or PC into a versatile keyboard workstation. Featuring a 49-key USB MIDI keyboard and the award-winning Key Rig software (PC only), KeyRig 49 makes it easy to start composing music with a computer and music software like M-Audio’s Session, Apple’s GarageBand, Ableton’s Live Lite (included) and others.

Designed for musicians on the go, the M-Audio Mobile Laptop Studio Bag is the safe way to transport portable music gear. The bag is designed to carry full-size laptops (up to 17”), audio interfaces, MIDI controllers like the Trigger Finger and all of your cables.

And the best thing is – you can order those products now, from Dolphin Music!

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