Posts Tagged ‘Google’

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Universal Music Group and Google are now partners in the music-video business

April 14, 2009
youtube-universal-200-80

Universal Music Group and Google are now partners in the music-video business.

The largest of the four top recording companies and YouTube’s parent company announced on Thursday that they are working together on Vevo, a new music and video entertainment service set to launch later this year. YouTube will handle the technology while Universal Music supplies the content. The two companies will share ad revenue.

The companies said and at this point it appears that Universal’s content and artists will be the only label represented on the site. However, Doug Morris, Universal Music’s chief executive, said in a conference call with the media that he is in negotiations with other top record labels and is confident they will join.

Google CEO Eric Schmidt said on the same conference call that YouTube and Universal Music have renewed their existing licensing agreement. YouTube will continue to be licensed to allow visitors to use songs from Universal Music. Professionally made videos from the label will only appear on Vevo, the companies said.

This is the first time that YouTube has launched a satellite Web site, Schmidt said but he added that he hopes there will be more.

For Universal Music, the move means that Morris has obtained the standalone music-video service that he has long wished for. Ever since MTV became a cultural force and huge financial success by offering music videos on TV, the record industry realized that it goofed in thinking of music videos as a promotional tool. Morris has said that in this era of declining revenue in the sector, he doesn’t see anything as “promotional” and argues that music videos are worth cash.

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YouTube Pulls Music Videos From UK

March 11, 2009
Youtube wide vs. UK flag

YouTube has pulled thousands of music videos off its UK web site in a dispute over rates and reporting with British collection society PRS. The take down could take several days, but gone will be videos from all four majors (WMG’s were pulled several weeks ago in an unrelated dispute) and most indies.

In a statement, PRS cried foul. “Google has told us they are taking this step because they wish to pay significantly less than at present to the writers of the music on which their service relies, despite the massive increase in YouTube viewing. This action has been taken without any consultation with PRS for Music and in the middle of negotiations between the two parties.”

But Google paints a very different picture. “PRS is now asking us to pay many, many times more for our license than before…we would lose significant amounts of money with every playback. In addition, PRS is unwilling to tell us what songs are included in the license they can provide so that we can identify those works…that’s like asking a consumer to buy an unmarked CD without knowing what musicians are on it.” Negotiations are said to be continuing to resolve the dispute.

undelete-youtube-videos

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If I was an unsigned/independent artist in 2009, I would (in no particular order)…

January 27, 2009

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Twitter

If you’re unaware of Twitter then allow me to inform you that 2009 will be the year of Tweeting and all things Twitteriffic. Twitter is a social network/micro blogging site which allows you to send and read messages of up to 140 characters in length (the same size as a standard SMS Text Message). Sound brief? That’s the whole point; you ‘Tweet’ to tease per se. “Did you see this article on how the Ting Ting’s are coping with the economic recession? (Insert mini link here)” for example.

Barack Obama Tweeted his way through the last election and Stephen Fry often informs us of his daily musings but this post here informs you of the 10 Twitters you should follow if you have an interest within the music industry. You should also have a gander at these articles; Gerd Leonhard’s “So now you’re on Twitter – so what should you do next?”, The Guardian’s “Making the most of Twitter”, About.com’s “How to use Twitter for music promotion” and Mashables “The top 10 reasons why I will not follow you in return on Twitter”. After you’ve read all of them you should be a Tweeting machine!

If my word isn’t proof enough for you I even noticed that Twitter was ‘Hot’ in the hot or not column of Glamour magazine last month and we all know they’re at the forefront of young professional female based technology.

Have a play with SEO

Now granted this is a rather technical one for all the geeks out there so if you fancy yourself as ‘web savvy’ then this is something to have a look into. SEO stands for ‘Search Engine Optimisation’ which in laymans terms simply means “If I type my artist name into Google, will I be at the top of the results?”. This is rather useful for those out there who may have a common name that is easily lost in the ether, for example my favourite folk artist ‘John Smith’; the man who possesses the most common name in Great Britain appears 6th when you search for him on Google but with a bit of SEO then he may very well appear higher. Want to listen to Liverpudlian electronic duo and Sentric’s favourites ‘A Cup Of Tea’? A search on Googles proves unsuccessful for the first 15 pages of results.

Read this by the ever brilliant Google and you’ll be way on your way…

Focus on making money from areas other than selling my music

As it stands the majority of artists reading this blog will be way off making a living from their art – such is life and the industry we work in – but there are a few areas that can help subsidise you through this downturn.

  • Performance Royalties Societies can obviously collect all your performance royalties for you, if its £40 or £4,000 its still money that’s yours so why not collect it?
  • Club nights- Quite a few artists of note started putting on gig nights in their home cities in order to earn a few bob (Kaiser Chiefs are probably the best example) but I do ask one thing of you, if you are going to do this then please do a good job! The last thing this country needs is more useless promoters. (Further reading: Where is Everyone? – The ‘art’ of gig promotion)
  • Merchandise – Nothing groundbreaking here but it’s unbelievable how lazy artists can be in terms of merchandise. Think outside the box. The world doesn’t need another name on a shirt (unless the name is emblazoned as an amazing looking logo of sorts) so be entrepreneurial; buy things that are cheap and add value to them somehow.
  • Library Music – Have you got decent quality recordings of old songs you don’t use/care for hanging around? Get in touch with a library music company and potentially earn money for nothing. An artist informed me “my mate makes over 10grand per year of 35 instrumental tracks and he doesn’t have to lift a finger to push them. I like them apples”.

Gig like hell

Simple one but the more you gig the more your music is heard, the better you get and the more you’re talked about.  Discuss with the rest of your group (or your imaginary friend if you’re a solo artist) how often you’re willing to gig.  Twice a week? A fortnight? A month? And start booking as many as possible in your region. Try to avoid playing the same city more than once a month though or people will get bored.

Practice like hell

Simple yet again but the more you practice the better you get.

Write constantly

When ‘us industry types’ go and see an artist we’re always keen to know how long the artist in question has been going for as there is a kind of music line graph in our head ranging from conception to death. This graph changes for each genre and artist type (I.E. solo or group) but click here for an example of an acoustic singer/songwriter (pinch of salt please).

The more you write the better your art will be (of course there are always exceptions to this rule but in the majority of cases practice really does make perfect).

Keep up to date with the industry I was part of

The internet is a wealth of information and knowledge and most of it won’t cost you a penny which is nice during this economic climate. (On a side note: remember when none of this money malarkey mattered? I was spending some time with my 2 year old niece recently and she was delirious with joy over a stickerbook. Amazing scenes. She probably thinks Credit Crunch is some form of biscuit treat. To quote Russell Howard “We’re all just a brief sneeze in time” – words to remember the next time you’re feeling the strain in your wallet, or just stressed about anything really).

Anyhow; coolfer, DiS, Gigwise, New Music Strategies, No Rock and Roll Fun, the twitter people mentioned above and of course the Sentric Music blog should be enough to keep you in the loop. Get used to using RSS feeds as well and it’ll save you no end of time.

Brand myself

This could be as simple as a colour/random object or as complicated as you’d like it to be, but is well worth implementing to your image. Using consistent branding and font styles to all your artwork/websites etc help continuity and also make you look more polished, but as before with the merchandise, think outside the box. Envy and Other Sins always set out their stage so it looks like my Nan’s hallway of sorts with rugs and hat stands and now every time I see a hat stand (which granted isn’t that often but that’s why it works in my opinion) I think of them. Extremely subtle yet effective at the same time.

Know who my fans are

Constantly get compared to a couple of well known artists? Well aim for their fans as chances are they’ve more chance of liking your music then others. Using tools like Last.fm, iTunes Genius or Amazon’s ‘people who bought this also bought’ feature can help you define the market you’re aiming for to give you a better chance of successful exposure.

You should also make the effort to engage with fans, responding to Myspace messages, emails, tweets, staying after gigs if any of them want to have a drink with you etc. Just be nice, it genuinely helps.

Utilise free tools

Mailing lists, analytical tools, blogging platforms, social networks etc They’re there, they’re free, they’re useful

Source : sentric.wordpress.com

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Podcasting: What is it? How do I do that?

November 21, 2008

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Podcasting is creating your own content (mp3 or video for example ) with intent for users to download using one of several programs that have been created to retrieve your audio file automatically, like iTunes or Google reader etc.

Podcasting is simply distributing audio content using RSS. The process is suprisingly simple, and by making audio content available using RSS, podcasters give listeners more control over what they listen to and when. Also, many podcasts are available for syndication, which increases a broadcasters exposure.

For more infomation on RRS check our article here

Here is a breakdown of what you will need and need to know to be able to Podcast:

Skills you may need….

1. How to record your audio and save it to an .mp3 file. (Video is of course also allowed)

2. How to upload the .mp3 file to a website or hosting service

3. How to upload the RSS “feed”  burner service.

After creating your material using an audio editing program of your choice you’ll need somwhere to store it online. if you have a sever upload it here, if your lost at the word ‘server’ …get a blog like ‘WordPress’ or ‘Blogger’.

The majority of things you will have to master in order to Podcast are online and if your new to Blogging, Podcasting is an ideal  reason to start. Your ‘Blog’ will allow to to upload you MP3’s and store them within your Blog enabling users to visit your site and download or even better ‘Subscribe’!

There are many different ways to create/ store your Podcasts, you just need to find the server and Feedburner that works for you, the videos here all do things a little different so dont worry if you do things different also!

An RSS feed is the final step in transforming your collection of audio/video files into a bona fide podcast! With FeedBurner’s SmartCast service, you can use any blogging tool that creates a feed to publish your podcast. Here’s how it works: If your blog post contains a link (<a href=””></a>) to an audio/video file, we’ll convert it to an RSS enclosure — a special link found only in your feed — that programs like iPodder, iTunes and NetNewsWire recognize. Google Reader and several other online readers also recognize enclosures and offer a playback link or audio control when they encounter them.

Equipment you may need…

1. Audio Editing Software

2. A Microphone

3. A Sound Card

Steinberg Sequel 2

Sequel turns you into a producer, and gives you your own fully-loaded music studio. You need HipHop beats for your latest track? Or want to surprise your friends at your next party with your own electro live-set? Sequel gives you everything you need to produce pro-quality tracks at home, on a plane, in the rehearsal room or even live…

Sony Media ACID Music Studio 7

If you’re serious about making your own music, ACID Music Studio software is the perfect tool for original song creation, multitrack audio and MIDI recording, and studio-quality mixing, and effects processing. Share your songs any way you want — burn your own CDs, upload to the web, prepare audio for podcasts, or export to your MP3 player.

Blue Snowflake

Blue offers up the Snowflake, the world’s first truly professional and portable USB mic. With plug-and-play simplicity, podcasts, web conferences, or adding voiceovers to video projects takes on a new level of ease and quality. The Snowflake is compatible with both Macs and PCs, and it’s low-profile design makes it a perfect fit with either desktop or laptop systems.…

Behringer Podcastudio USB

Introducing the Radiolutionary Podcastudio USB Bundle from Behringer. Looking for a new way to express yourself? Ever wanted to be a famous producer? Then podcasting is the answer and the Behringer Podcastudio bundle has all you need to make high-quality podcasts and home recordings. Go on air straight out of the box with this fantastic Podcastudio recording…

Samson C03U Recording Pak – Recording / Podcasting Pak

Samson changed the way the world records audio with the C01U and C03U USB Studio Condenser microphones — the first studio quality condenser microphones equipped with a USB interface. The C03U Recording / Podcasting Pak includes everything needed to record digital audio on a PC or Mac with an eye on maximum portability.

Edirol UA-25EX

Mobile Connectivity with Pro-Studio Extras Rugged, compact, and feature-filled, the new UA-25EX is a portable-interface powerhouse. Ideal for computer-based audio engineers who appreciate mobility, this 24bit/96kHz USB audio interface is equipped with pro-grade microphone preamps, a newly-developed analog compressor/limiter, and ground-lift functionality for studio and stage.

Tascam US-144

The follow-up to the mega popular US-122, the new US-144 delivers everything you’d want in a portable audio/MIDI interface and more.

Record two tracks at a time with zero latency; whether you have a PC or a Mac, your song ideas go down in real time, real easy. Its size means you can take it anywhere you go…

Edirol R-09HR Including Free 4GB SD Card

The R-09HR is a professional, high-definition recorder that travels light and performs like a heavyweight. With crystal-clear 24/96 fidelity, the R-09HR is the new flagship of EDIROL’s award-winning R-series recorders. Features 24-bit/96kHz linear PCM high-resolution, low-noise recording Newly developed Isolated Adaptive Recording Circuit (I.A.R.C.) High-grade, high-sensitivity stereo condenser microphone built in …

List of sites that accept podcast submissions.

iTunes – submit your iTune podcasts

Podcasting Station – submit podcasts to the podcasting directory

Podcasting News – submit podcasts to the podcasting directory

DigitalPodcast – enter the category scroll to the bottom and click add url

Podcast Alley – submit podcast title, website, xml feed, and description.

Podcast Bunker– recommend a podcast, only high quality podcasts will be added.

Podcast411– add a podcast

AllPodcasts – index a podcast (an RSS 2.0 feed with an audio enclosure), enter the URL for the RSS feed into the field below and click “Index”.

iPodderx – submit podcasts to ipodderx directory

audio.weblogs – ping audio web logs to update them

Podcast.net – List your podcast on podcast.net and watch your audience grow!

PodcastHost – add a podcast to PodcastHost

Podsites.com – post a “podsite”

Pocketcasting – submit a podcast

RSS Network – submit to podcast category

Podcast Pickle – submit to podcast category

Plazoo – submit to podcasts or vlogs

Singing Fish – submit music/video directory

Blog Universe – submit podcasts to directory

Digital Podcasts – add podcasts to the digital podcast directory

PodFeeder – podcast submission

PodFeed – podcast submission

Open Media Network – submit audio and videocasts

Podcast Charts – chart podcasts (requires membership)

iPassages – Christian podcast submissions

My Podcast Center – small podcast directory

PodBlaze – small podcast directory

Podcast Shownotes – post podcasts on blog

Loomia – post podcasts and rss feeds

GetAPodcast – post podcasts and rss feeds

Syndic8 Podcast – post podcasts and rss feeds

Podcast Shuffle – post podcasts

idiotvox – submit a podcast feed

Blinkx – submit a podcast feed

PodNova – submit a podcast

PodCasts Yahoo – submit a podcast (top right corner)

Blast Podcasts – submit podcasts

Pod Spider – submit podcasts

Pod Lounge – The Pod Lounge relies on user submissions to help build the database and we appreciate any additions you can provide

Amigo Fish – submit a feed/podcast

AudioFeeds – submit music podcasts only

Every Podcast – submit podcasts

Fluctu8 – submit podcasts

Get a Podcast – submit podcasts

HardPodCafe – submit podcasts

Podcast Shuffle – submit podcasts

Podcaster World – submit podcasts

Podcast Pup – submit podcasts

PodTower – submit podcasts

Vital Podcasts – submit podcasts

Religious Podcasts – submit religious podcasts (only accept religious casts)

Educational Podcasts – submit educational podcasts

Podcast Videos – submit videocasts

Feedshark – automate submissions to 10 podcast sites

YakkYakk – podcast submissions

Pluggd – podcast submissions

Canadian Podcasts – submit podcasts

Fetching Podcasts – submit podcasts

GODcasts1000 – submit Christian podcasts

Church Podcasts – submit Christian podcasts

Realty Feeds – submit real estate podcasts or feeds

MLPodcasts – submit realty podcasts

Podcast Directory – submit all podcasts

Medical Feeds – submit medical podcasts

Sports Podcasts – submit medical podcasts

Podcast Reviews – submit podcasts

Tech Podcasts – submit technology podcasts

FireAnt – submit podcasts

Podcast Pup – add a podcasts

Vital Podcasts – add podcasts

PodcastLikeThat – add podcast feeds

Australian Podcasts – submit podcast feeds

GetAPodcast – submit podcasts

Pod-Planet – submit podcasts

Sports Podcasts – Submit sports related RSS feeds and podcasts.

Political Podcasts – Submit political feeds and podcasts.

Government Podcasts – Submit podcasts and feeds ONLY from government agencies. Feeds from both Local and federal governments are accepted.

iBiz Radio – Submit podcasts (only submit business podcasts)

Podcast Blaster – Submit podcasts

YouLoud – add podcasts

Vital Podcasts – add podcasts

Educational Podcasts – Submit educational podcasts and feeds.

Blubrry Podcasts – login to submit podcasts.

Podcast Empire – submit podcasts.

AOL Podcast Beta – submit podcasts.

Podcast Like That – submit podcasts.

AudioFeeds.org – submit podcasts.

Digg Podcasts – DIGG podcast directory.

EPN – Educational Podcast Network

Family Friendly Podcasts – submit child safe podcasts

Hwy777 – submit christian podcasts

Mirpod – submit podcasts.

Podcast Directory AU – submit Australian podcasts.

Podcaster World – submit podcasts.

Pod Farm – submit podcasts.

PodMopolis – submit podcasts.

RECAP – submit educational podcasts.

Speecha – submit audio podcasts.

Women in Podcasting – submit podcasts.