Posts Tagged ‘laptop’

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Young band use Garagband and the internal Microphone on Laptop only

April 15, 2009
A snippet of the latest and greatest that our galaxy has to offer? Founded in 2003 in Auckland, New Zealand,  Yesterday Was Mine are now based in London and hope to be “the next greatest thing since ‘cafe lattes’ ” They recorded their debut album entirely on a laptop…

Yesterday Was Mine are Paul Taite (vocals / bass), Adam Leggett (guitar) and Steve Taite (drums).

Band’s biography –  from their website:

The band was inspired after Richard O’Brien (Rocky Horror Show) suggested to Paul that he should start writing his own music as most musicians never do. Paul then inked a diagram into his grail diary outlining what would later become the ‘Yesterday Was Mine’ coat of arms. Paul was in!

However progress was halted due to a guitary-like void appearing in most songs. As Paul perused the unemployment papers over a Mocha at Cafe Cezanne, it dawned on him to place the following classified ad – Guitar hero wanted.

Adam was reading the paper with his morning toast and coffee when his destiny appeared to him as an obscure stain left by his coffee cup – it was not apparent at the time, but that stain would later be exclaimed as an exact replica of the ceiling of the Sistine chapel . And as luck would have it, Paul’s ad was the canvas.

Adam was in! However the band now faced a new issue, where was the man behind the kit? the final knight to join Paul and Adam at the round table so to speak. Steve at the time was drumming for an underground 80’s ‘hair metal’ band. After a show, Steve was approached in the parking lot by two cloaked figures. It was none other than Paul and Adam, they left him with an inscribed stone tablet, and Steve was left with more questions than answers.

The tablet contained a pledge. The inscription spoke of a promise – a case of ice cold Dr Pepper after every show. Steve was in! He then rightfully assumed his place at the table.

Therefore if you add the final third to the previous two thirds of the ‘then to be’ band – it creates a whole!! Ladies and gentleman,  I dub thee ‘Yesterday Was Mine’.

Credit Crunch Music:

Yesterday Was Mine decided to record their debut album the cheapest way they could find – by themselves, using just a laptop and the Garageband software. Singer Paul Taite cheekily says that they wanted “to help the credit crunch affected nation get some free tunes (ok that wasn’t the original reason but it’s turned that way)”

The band says that they were not too concerned about recording quality:

“Before we get too carried away – the quality isn’t amazing. Instead of being recorded in a studio, it was recorded in a front bedroom flat – but what it lacks in production quality it makes up for in heart! The guitar / bass was directly plugged into a laptop input socket … and the singing / drums was recorded with nothing more than the internal mic on a laptop computer. With all of the hurdles in the way, the band feels really pleased with the end result!”

The Gear:

– Laptop, Garageband, Les Paul guitar, Fender P-Bass, Pearl Drum Kit, Boss TU-2 Tuner. Bassist Paul Taite says he’s also looking into purchasing a Fender Bassman 150.

For more info and free downloads:

http://www.yesterdaywasmine.com

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Korg Offers Black Color Option For Stylish, Compact Nanoseries Controllers

January 16, 2009

Korg Is Now Adding A Black Color Option For The Three Products In Its Nanoseries (Http://Www.Korgnano.Com/) of Slimline USB-Powered Controllers, Joining The Popular White Models. The Intuitive Nanokey™ Nanopad™ And Nanokontrol™ Offer Advanced Functionality Combined With Korg’s Renowned Reliability In A Choice Of Compact Control Surfaces. Specifically Designed For Musicians Who Need The Power Of A Professional Controller, The Nanoseries Easily Fits On Top Of A Workstation, In Front Of A Laptop, On A Recording Console Or Anywhere Else Users Need Control Over Their Daw, Virtual Instruments/Effects Or Dj Software.

At 12.6″ W X 3.27″ D X 0.55″ H And 0.49 Lbs., The 25-Key Velocity-Sensitive Nanokey Is A Midi Keyboard Controller That Provides A Great Feel And Maximum Expressivity In An Ultra-Compact Package. The Keys Can Be Set To Send Midi Control Data, Via The Cc Mode Button, For Control Over Any Midi Assignable Parameters Within The Software Being Used. An Octave Shift Up/Down Function Yields Immediate Access To The Entire Midi Note Range, And Pitch Up/Down And Modulation Buttons Offer Even Greater Expressivity.

The Highly Responsive Nanopad Drum Pad Controller Is Equipped With 12 Velocity-Sensitive Trigger Pads That Offer Unsurpassed Power. The Pads Can Send Both Note And Midi Cc Data, While An X/Y Pad Delivers Real-Time Control Of Roll And Flam Timing And Dynamics. A New Chord Trigger Function Lets The User Enter Chords Onto A Single Pad. The X/Y Pad Can Also Send Midi Control Change Messages, Making It Ideal For Controlling Functions Such As Pitch And Volume. At Only 12.6″ W X 3.23″ D X 0.65″ H And 0.73 Lbs., The Nanopad’s Compact Footprint Enhances Its Appeal

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Turn your laptop into a multi instument keyboard and vocal-processing powerhouse

January 9, 2009

missilesilo_laptop

Regardless of what instrument you play or what software you use to record and compose, it’s never been easier to access massive libraries of synth and sample sounds, guitar and bass amp emulations, vintage-derived effects and so on. While all of this power and flexibility has been a boon for the home recordist, bringing these same software-derived sounds to the stage continues to vex many. The good news is that today’s multicore laptops have more than enough horsepower to handle the needs of most keyboardists, guitarists and experimental-leaning vocalists, as well as multi-instrumentalists who may need to jump between several instruments during a set. By choosing the correct software and hardware, as well as doing some critical housekeeping and asset-management chores, you can easily bring your best software instruments and effects to that stage and consolidate your hardware needs down to a few roadworthy essentials.

The host with the most

First and foremost, all of your software instruments and effects need to live somewhere. While it’s completely feasible for a keyboardist or guitarist to work solely within a workstation-style product such as Propellerhead Reason or Native Instruments GuitarRig, if you really want to take advantage of your plug-in collection or jump between instruments, you need to employ a more open-ended option. Two products that are built expressly for this purpose are Apple MainStage — part of the Apple Logic Studio bundle (; www.apple.com/logicstudio) — and Native Instruments Kore 2, which is now available in a software-only edition , as well as the software/hardware package  (www.native-instruments.com). Both programs do many of the same things: 1. They allow you to access, organize, edit, combine and recall the majority of the third-party plug-ins on your machine. 2. Both allow you to play software instruments and process live audio sources (guitar, bass, vocals and even feedback loops). 3. By largely removing the traditional elements of a DAW, both of these apps allow more CPU resources to be used for instruments and effects, thus keeping latency in check.

Choosing a host performance application will depend largely on what software you already own. Logic Studio users have a clear advantage in this department because all channel strips and saved plug-in settings are immediately available in MainStage; in other words, what you did in the studio shows up in MainStage. Kore, however, requires a little more prep work in the beginning (users will need to batch-convert their third-party plug-in sounds over to the KoreSound format), but it offers support for a wider range of plug-in formats as well as Windows PCs.

Time to organise..

The second major task in prepping your sounds for performance is figuring out exactly what you need and exactly what you don’t. If your goal is to replicate the sounds you used in your recordings, a recent demo or what have you, then that is the obvious place to start. Open up the original sessions, isolate the plug-ins that you need to use live and give each preset a specific name before saving them to a new folder. Of course, you can skip that step if you want to dive in and start playing. Either way, once you start to have a firmer grasp on what you’re going to need in a live show or rehearsal situation, that’s the time to start creating a performance library.

MainStage and Kore have different ways of creating that library. With MainStage, you’ll need to create a new Concert. A Concert can comprise any number of live audio and instrument channels, and the Performance pane can be customized to include a wide array of assignable controllers (which you can then easily map to your hardware), meters and patch selectors. You can load instruments and live signal processors in a row and select them interchangeably like presets on a piece of hardware. A single preset can comprise both audio and instrument plug-ins, and a Concert can include any number of presets. When you load a new Concert, all the associated instruments and samples are loaded in the background, and nothing really nails the CPU until a preset is selected. The load time between presets is generally very minimal.

The no hassle, buy nothing keyboard workstation

If you’re a budget-conscious keyboardist and you want a simple and reliant way to access an array of keyboard sounds that requires practically zero mousing around and almost no MIDI assignment editing, here it is.

Load up an empty 16-track session in your DAW of choice. Starting with the first track in the session, load up your first instrument sound and set this track to receive only MIDI channel 1. Repeat the process as needed (track 2 to MIDI channel 2, etc.) until you’ve loaded up all of the sounds you need or you’re out of MIDI channels. Changing MIDI channels on most portable MIDI keyboards (M-Audio Oxygen 8 V2, Axiom 49, etc.) is a simple one- or two-button process. With this setup, you only have to load one session into your DAW, and switching between sounds is as simple as changing the MIDI channel on your controller.

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M-Audio Products Offer Compatibility With Latest Apple Laptops

December 10, 2008


If you’re thinking about getting a new Apple laptop, there’s never been a better time to take the plunge—the latest MacBook.


MacBook Air and MacBook Pro laptops offer faster speed, better performance and a sleek new design. And don’t worry, all of your M-Audio® hardware and software products work seamlessly with the new generation of Apple laptops.
USB 2.0 Series
Apple’s new MacBook and MacBook Air laptops don’t include FireWire connectivity—the latest models are all about USB 2.0. If you want to make music with a MacBook, M-Audio’s Fast Track® Ultra and Fast Track Ultra 8R high-speed USB 2.0 interfaces deliver the perfect solution. We also offer a full range of bus-powered USB 1.1 devices for making music on the go.
FireWire Series
All M-Audio FireWire interfaces are fully compatible with the FireWire 800 port on the new MacBook Pro laptops—all you need is a 6-pin–to–9-pin FireWire cable. Read more about FireWire 800.
Software Products
All M-Audio software releases, including Torq® DJ software, are fully compatible with the latest Apple laptops.

M-Audio Oxygen 8 v2

The Oxygen 8 v2 is an updated version of the mobile MIDI controller that started the mobile studio revolution. You get a fully functional MIDI keyboard with great action, plus eight MIDI-assignable knobs to control any MIDI parameters you desire in your hardware or software. It’s perfect for composing on the go or performing live bass lines and pads,…

M-Audio Audiophile 2496

The Audiophile 2496 embodies a quantum leap in computer audio fidelity and performance unequalled by other audio cards in its price range. This critically acclaimed PCI card features premium digital audio converters, elegant board design and ultra-stable drivers just like the rest of the Delta line, but with a simpler I/O configuration. As a member of the Delta family,…

M-Audio UNO USB

M-Audio’s smallest and simplest USB MIDI interface, USB Uno offers basic 1 x 1 operation and bus-powered mobility—and even comes with it’s own built-in USB and MIDI cables. What could be simpler? Features 1-in/1-out MIDI interface 16 MIDI input channels 16 MIDI output channels Bus-powered—requires no external power supply …

M-Audio Fast Track

If you make music with GarageBand or other software recording programs, Fast Track USB is the easiest way to record your guitar with professional results. Just connect Fast Track USB to the USB port of your computer and you’re ready to rock. Fast Track USB has an input for instruments like guitar, bass and keyboards, plus a microphone input…

M-Audio Audiophile 192

The Audiophile 192 continues the legacy of M-Audio’s industry-standard Delta audio card line. Building on our Audiophile 2496—one of the world’s most popular audio cards—the Audiophile 192 features high-definition 192kHz sampling rate, digital I/O, balanced analog I/O and an amazing signal-to-noise ratio. The Audiophile 192 represents a new benchmark in audio performance that’s as good as it gets for…

M-Audio Delta 66

The Delta 66 delivers 24-bit/96kHz to your desktop, complete with digital I/O for pristine file transfers and surround sound passthrough. The rugged external breakout box gives you the convenience of making connections to the four 1/4” TRS analog inputs and outputs right on your desktop—no more fumbling behind the computer. Need more professional connectivity? Simply add the critically acclaimed…

M-Audio Keystation 61es

The Keystation 61e is a 61-note USB keyboard with velocity-sensitive, semi-weighted keys that is designed to easily integrate in any computer music environment. Class compliancy with Mac OS X and Windows XP delivers true plug-and-play setup. The Keystation 61e is also compatible with many music education and music creation software titles, making it ideal for classrooms and studios alike.…

M-Audio Delta 1010LT

The Delta 1010LT delivers much of the same universal connectivity, high fidelity and seamless performance as the popular Delta 1010 on a single PCI card—and at a fraction of the price. Multiple analog I/O, MIDI, S/PDIF and surround sound support are all here. Two inputs even have mic/line preamps on XLR connectors, saving the expense of outboard preamps. It’s…