Posts Tagged ‘Universal’

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How to Make Your Guitar Sound Like a Sax! The Sonuus G2M

April 22, 2009

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No modifications are required to your guitar; no special pickups to install; and nothing needs to be “stuck” onto your instrument. It works with all electric guitars.

The G2M™ is a simple-to-use, highly effective, guitar-to-MIDI converter. It is “Universal” because it doesn’t need a special pick-up mounted on your guitar, but instead simply connects to your guitar like any other effects pedal or tuner.

Designed to give accurate triggering, with low-latency, it is a true plug-and-play solution for monophonic MIDI guitar. It can be used to sequence bass lines and guitar solos add an edge to your live performances — it opens up many creative possibilities.

Features

  • Any electric guitar can be used as a solo MIDI guitar.
  • No guitar modifications or special pickups required.
  • Robust note detection — minimises wrong notes.
  • Accurate pitch-bend determination.
  • Low latency.
  • Built-in tuner for standard guitar tuning.
  • Battery-powered with long battery life.
  • Compact, lightweight and portable.

Universal Appeal

No modifications are required to your guitar; no special pickups to install; and nothing needs to be “stuck” onto your instrument. It works with all electric guitars.

The G2M™ universally appeals to all guitarists from novices to seasoned professionals. Keenly priced to fit any budget, with the robust reliable performance expected by the finest stagemen.

Incredibly simple to use:

  1. Plug your guitar into instrument in to power-up the G2M™
  2. Connect your MIDI device (or computer) to the MIDI out
  3. Play notes on your guitar and MIDI will be sent out!

Powered from a single PP3 battery, its long battery life combined with small size makes the G2M™ the ideal accessory to keep with your guitar. Not only does it provide fast and precise tuning, but it also gives you instant MIDI capability for any electric guitar!

Robust Performance

Research has shown us that the most important aspect for pitch-to-MIDI conversion is reliable and reproducible triggering of notes. While low-latency is important, robust triggering is the key to usability — you can easily adapt to some latency, but you cannot adapt to random, spurious notes.

By virtue of the unique, inherently robust technology used in the G2M™ you will be able to reliably generate accurate MIDI quickly and easily. Notes are generated exactly as played, and the nuances of your performance are captured with fast, accurate pitch-bend data.

Built-in Tuner

The built-in tuner uses our PULSAR™ tuning technology where the power LED doubles as a tuning indicator. This innovative tuner gives you a fast and accurate way to tune your guitar.

Instrument Thru

Featuring a high-impedance input circuit, the G2M™ won’t sap your tone when using it “in-line” before your amp, or other effects pedals. You can then easily combine MIDI sounds with your normal guitar sound for some exciting musical possibilities.

Improves Playing Technique

For optimal MIDI conversion, your guitar playing needs to be clean and accurate. Accidental notes, resonating open strings and other sounds can often be converted into undesired MIDI notes. Often you don’t hear these when playing guitar yourself, but can detect them easily when listening live to the generated MIDI.

Striving to improve MIDI note accuracy, encourages clean picking and accurate fingering, with good control over non-sounding strings by damping them.

Not only will your MIDI output be more accurate, your normal guitar playing will sound clearer and more professional. It’s like having a tutor sitting beside you giving you advice. It’s also great fun!

Most of all, it’s Fun!

When you try the G2M™ and generate some new sounds, the first thing that strikes you is how much fun it is. Unleash new creative inspiration and invigorate your soul.

Specification

  • Power supply 9V PP3 battery. Average current consumption < 10mA. (Typically more than 70 hours operating time.)
  • Tuner notes E2, A2, D3, G3, B3, E4 (Standard 6-string guitar tuning)
  • Tuner accuracy <1 cent when pulsing at <1Hz
  • Note detection range E2 to E6
  • MIDI latency 16ms to 30ms depending on note and characteristics of input signal
  • MIDI power 5V (via 200 ohm resistor as per the MIDI specification)
  • Size 83mm x 58mm x 34mm
  • Weight 80g (without battery)
  • Inputs 6.35mm mono jack (switches unit on when jack is inserted)
  • Outputs 6.35mm mono jack connected directly to input jack. Standard 5-pin MIDI socket.
  • Switches Boost switch to select between low- and high-output guitars
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Universal Music Group and Google are now partners in the music-video business

April 14, 2009
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Universal Music Group and Google are now partners in the music-video business.

The largest of the four top recording companies and YouTube’s parent company announced on Thursday that they are working together on Vevo, a new music and video entertainment service set to launch later this year. YouTube will handle the technology while Universal Music supplies the content. The two companies will share ad revenue.

The companies said and at this point it appears that Universal’s content and artists will be the only label represented on the site. However, Doug Morris, Universal Music’s chief executive, said in a conference call with the media that he is in negotiations with other top record labels and is confident they will join.

Google CEO Eric Schmidt said on the same conference call that YouTube and Universal Music have renewed their existing licensing agreement. YouTube will continue to be licensed to allow visitors to use songs from Universal Music. Professionally made videos from the label will only appear on Vevo, the companies said.

This is the first time that YouTube has launched a satellite Web site, Schmidt said but he added that he hopes there will be more.

For Universal Music, the move means that Morris has obtained the standalone music-video service that he has long wished for. Ever since MTV became a cultural force and huge financial success by offering music videos on TV, the record industry realized that it goofed in thinking of music videos as a promotional tool. Morris has said that in this era of declining revenue in the sector, he doesn’t see anything as “promotional” and argues that music videos are worth cash.

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Eminem sues his own record label

February 25, 2009

Eminem sues his own record label

Eminem

Eminem: has royalty issues.

Eminem’s Relapse album might be set to be released via Universal Music, but a new lawsuit suggests that all is not completely well between artist and record company.

It’s being reported that F.B.T. Productions, Eminem’s publishing company, is suing Universal Music Group for $1.6m for unpaid digital royalties.

The case has come about because of a disagreement over whether a download sale – of a song or ringtone, for example – should fall under a licensing or distribution agreement. When music is sold in a physical format, it’s said to be licensed, and artists receive a higher royalty.

However, it seems that Universal has up to now been putting Eminem’s digital sales under the distribution header, meaning that he’s been paid less.

The trial is expected to feature several high-profile testimonies, including one (via video) from Apple CEO Steve Jobs, who’s currently on leave of absence from the company. He’ll be asked to speak about the iTunes Music Store’s relationship with Universal, presumably.

It’s being speculated that a victory for Eminem could be the catalyst for other artists to bring similar cases against record labels.

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Ireland’s biggest ISP agrees to a 3 strikes disconnection

February 4, 2009

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The great copyright debate contiues with a move forward from Ireland.

Eircom, Ireland’s biggest internet service provider (ISP), has agreed to disconnect users that record companies identify as copyright infringers. The agreement was reached eight days into an Irish High Court trial.

The former state monopoly ISP, which is now privately owned, has agreed to give two warnings to subscribers before cutting them off.

Record industry group the International Federation of the Phonographic Industries (IFPI) said that it would be taking action against other ISPs to ensure they did the same.

“The record companies will supply Eircom with the IP addresses of all persons who they detect illegally uploading or downloading copyrighted works on a P2P [peer to peer] basis,” said a statement from the IFPI.

“Eircom has agreed that it will from now on implement a graduated process,” it said. “The record companies have agreed that they will take all necessary steps to put similar agreements in place with all other ISPs in Ireland.”

The case involved the four major labels EMI, Universal, Warner and Sony.

Eircom said that when it received the labels’ list of people they suspected of engaging in illegal file-sharing, it would tell its customers that infringement had been detected.

If the activity continues Eircom will warn the subscriber that they will be cut off if there is no change in behaviour. If the file sharing continues the customer will be disconnected.

EMI Ireland managing director Willie Kavanagh is also the head of the Irish Recorded Music Association (IRMA), which is affiliated to the IFPI.

“[This is] something we’ve had to work together to make sure this got to a stage where we can deal with what is an enormous difficulty within the Irish and worldwide record business,” he told broadcaster RTE.

The ‘three strikes and you’re out’ policy is a popular one with rights holders, who are lobbying Governments across Europe to force ISPs to implement it.

The UK Government stopped short of including such a demand in its Digital Britain report last month. It said that it plans to force ISPs to pass details of subscriber activity to rights holders but did not demand that they disconnect users.